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When you use " You, You'll, You've, yous, you're, your? what's the difference and it's there more yous? .

English .

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Hi lokita1997 You is singular direct "how are you, who are you, you are here etc" You'll is a contraction for You Will.." You'll love this cereal, You'll be going downstairs." You've is a past tense contraction for You Have. "You've gotten A's in the past, You've been tricked". Yous is NOT proper English don't use it unless you are talking slangy to friends "yous is funny" LOL. there are also: You're (you are as in You're in trouble) and Your (possesive as in it's your life)

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That doesn't make it proper English, You Is, is not proper English. Proper English would be You Are, or You're. so You Is and Yous would be Slang and should not be used in any circumstance where proper English is required.
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Mrs.DeanaWynn thank you so much this answer helped me a lot I got another question is it the same for the words like " we, we're, we've, we'll? thank you so much
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yes it would be the same rules Lokita, and You'RE welcome ;)
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