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Was there transportation between the north and the south (U.S.) in the 19th century?

I have looked everywhere online and can't seem to find the answer to this question. I know there were trains, for example, in the north mainly but also in the south. However, was there transportation (even by sea) BETWEEN the two? Everyone knows that the north and the south were against each other then, but did citizens still travel to and from these areas, like to visit someone?

If someone has the answer, I would be more than grateful for you to tell me. Including the source where you found your information would be even more helpful.

Or maybe, does someone know where I can find the answer, myself?

Thank you.

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ClaraListensprechen

You can look up the answer under steam boats as well as trains. That was the big era of steam and north/south travel was primarily done via the Mississippi River; trains just connected with its ports (Trans Continental excepted). Samuel Clemens was an authority on that mode of popular north/south transportation, in that era.

East and west coastlines also served as north/south routes.

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Trains, Cardge, Horse, ect.

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The north and the south only spent five years of the 19th century at war. Yes, they had roads, rail and shipping lanes connecting them.

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