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scuffnstuff

Would a bullet fired parallel to a flat service make contact in the same time as one dropped from the same height?

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Yes, the force pulling the bullet down would cause it to hit the surface just the same as if you held a bullet and dropped it from the same height.

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Mind=blown

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No. The shot bullet will travel faster than a dropped object. Also, ask Superman, who is faster than a speeding bullet.

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scuffnstuff
The answer is yes.
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Question: If you think you know the answer then why are you asking us? Honestly...
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scuffnstuff
I give you credit for asking a question better than mine. My reason for asking was simply to challenge your thought process and not to offend you. If I have done so, I appologize.
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Not at all.. I thought you were one of the kids needing homework help. Sorry. You can challenge away at us..
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But the "homework help" you are giving, HaiMai, is totally wrong!!
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scuffnstuff
Sorry, rghurst, I don't understand what you mean.
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I hope I'd never claim to be right 100% of the time, rghurst. I'm happy to be corrected if I am wrong, as scuffnstuff already has. Clearly I shouldn't have answered this one! Lol :)
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No. You have given too little info to give a mathematical answer. But a gun fired from a table (3 ft off the ground) with the barrel parallel to the ground will take from one to several seconds to travel the mile (or so) it can travel. BUT, the bullet dropped at your feet will be there in about 1/3 of a second.

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scuffnstuff
I have given as much as required to answer correctly. The answer is yes.
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Nope. a bullet travles at the speed of between 1000 and 4000 fps. So it would take between one and two seconds to reach the ground. a bullet dropped frim your hand drops at 24ft per second per second. Do the math. how long to drop 3' at 24' per second. 24' divided by 3' equals one eighths of a second.Guns usually shoot for one mile (give or take) so that would take (at a minimum of the fastest bullet 4000fps) would take 1.5 seconds to target. How does your math work out?
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You have to specify what gun, what bullet weight, what powder charge, and what the height of the drop is for an accurate answer.

Your question reminds me of a High School trivia question: Which would fall faster in the vacuum of space, a brick or a feather? Both fall equally, in a vacuum. Doesn't make sense, but it's true.
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scuffnstuff
I do not think you are taking into consideration the fact that a gun's scope (line of sight) is far from parallel to the barrel. If a barrel were aimed parallel with the ground, that so called 1.5 seconds would drop considerably and well short of any target.
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This is why America is falling behind in the world. No one seems to understand even basic things like gravity!!
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And I think you have overlooked the curvature of the earth. A barrel that is absolutely parallel to earth is actually pointing above the horizon. So, You need to re evaluate your concept of what you mean. As I said earlier, you have NOT given enough parameters to give an absolute answer with defiintive accuracy.
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You are correct IF the barrel is absolutely horizontle then you are correct. However, you have mixed up the scope, sighting thing.
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Tractortug is adding all sorts of irrelevant things. The purpose of the question is to illustrate that gravity affects all things equally, and horizontal velocity has no effect on how fast something falls, as too many of the people answering this question seem to believe. If ANYTHING is propelled sideways parallel to the ground (which is not perfectly smooth, so the local topography is much more important than the curvature of the earth), it will fall at the same rate as an identical object that is dropped (the objects must be the same to account for air resistance).
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This example is not a good one, but I do seem to recall the example from my physics class. The high velocity projectile would leave the 'horizontal' and actually start climbing, since 'over the curve of the earth' would make it initially skew the results. The example of two objects being dropped at the same time would apply if the objects were going to land relatively near each other. Something akin to the slingshot, versus the rifle shot compared to the dropped bullet.

To make this clearer, a person standing there firing a gun absolutely horizontally, would actually be firing it UP at the distance. it is the same as the wading pools at the Washington Monument. The water is the same distance over the sill so to speak, but the grade of the pool actually has to be curved to allow for the curvature of the earth.

I wish I could post a picture on here to show how the curvature of the earth is dropping 8" (over flat ground, with no allowance for topography) per mile. So, for a travel of a half mile (as a reasonable amount of distance of a rilfe shot with no elevation in sighting) the measurement of the drop between the two would be 4' difference. THAT is a measurable difference. So, using the initial standing height of 60" for a start of the equation, the rifle shot is starting out at 64". That is what I was trying to say in my original argument. Right, Wrong, or indifferent.
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I'm not sure your figure of 8" per mile is correct, but assuming it is you are tecnnically right. However, as I said, you are missing the point of the question, which is to demonstrate that gravity is the same regardless of horizontal velocity. As you can see from many of the answers, especially FarmerGirl's, many people don't understand this basic concept.
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Except in the case of modern sniper rifles. They fire a bullet that has an almost exactly flat trajectory, and go for over a mile. So they would indeed 'fly' fir far longer than a dropped bullet. (or any object)

Your example of a bullet (being fired and dropped) is a poor example to show. A more appropriate example (that people SEE, and can understand) would be two objects, one thrown one dropped, would land at the same time. This can be seen, and visualized. A bullet being shot is invisible and too abstract.
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Here is the reason a 'Bullet' scenario is invalid. It has a good visual to explain the horizon and the curvature of the earth.

http://www.davidsenesac.com/Information/line_of_sight.html
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Depends on the velocity of the round.

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scuffnstuff
Sorry you are wrong. The faster the bullet the farther it travels, but it does so in the same amount of time. The correct answer is "yes".
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I don't understand why so many people don't understand this simple problem. If the bullet is fired upward, of course it would take longer to hit the ground, but the question says that it is horizontal, so both bullets will fall at the same rate and hit the ground at exactly the same time. the horizontal speed of the bullet has zero effect on the effect of gravity.
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Absolutely not.

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scuffnstuff
Absolutely wrong. The answer is yess
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Sure. In your little alternate universe.
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scuffnstuff
No need to lambaste me for what is taught in engineering school.
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Perhaps in MORON engineering school. SO not true.
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Gravity does not depend on belief. Everything falls at the same rate, despite what you might have seen in a Wile E. Coyote cartoon.
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You're forgetting a couple of things... such as velocity, trajectory... this has nothing to do with belief, and everything to do with science. The rate of fall is NOT the same when a bullet is dropped compared to when it is shot from a firearm. You can pretend to be brilliant all you want, but you are absolutely WRONG on this.
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Oh, and I looked up the websites that you all are citing... and there are twice as many which PROVE the opposite. Your THEORY is based on junk science.
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Oh my god, now gravity is "junk science." Every 10th grade physics class has a demonstration of this simple principle using two balls and an air-powered gun. Horizontal velocity has zero effect on gravity unless the object has wings or something that would generate lift from the motion throug the air. Bullets and balls will fall at exactly the same speed regardless of their horizontal velocity.
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actually I just looked it up, it would. I was wrong, the bullet would make contact at the same time, hypothetically. it probably also depends on factors like barrel length, etc.

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Yes

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Yes , in a vacuum only . But it will be very very close either way.

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Any bullet fired in any direction travels much faster than a free falling bullet

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The questin is not how FAR the bullet will travel, but when it will hit the ground. Both will hit at exactly the same time, but the fired one will be farther away.
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Yes, both will fall at exactly the same rate and both will hit the ground at exactly the same time. Air resistance in the vertical direction is exactly the same so it works the same in air and a vacuum. Horizontal velocity has no effect on the pull of gravity.

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Thanks , I thought I might be wrong.
I don't see though why there wouldn't be some small degree of lift as it passes through the air.Maybe it is negated by the air resistance. Do you happen to know?
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Because a bullet is cylindrical, there is no lift. There is air resistance, but it is the same for a dropped bullet and the vertical dimension of a fired bullet, so air resistance makes no difference in how long it takes a bullet to reach the ground.
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