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Am I ready to own a horse?

I have been riding regularly for around four years. I've attended several horse camps and taken lessons for a few years. I've leased a horse and shown with him. I am comfortable at all four gaits on a trained horse and have jumped, done western events and bareback jumping and galloping. I also have trail ridden. I want to buy a horse and keep it at my house. I have five acres, the horse would get around three. He would have a companion in the form of another horse or pony. He would have a run in shelter and a shed but he wouldn't be stalled or blanketed (I don't believe in that stuff) My family isn't very knowledgable about horses but I think I am knowledgable enough to keep a horse happy and healthy. I can identify a lot of common illnesses and know when to call a vet. My major concerns are- What if my horse runs away? And what if he gets sick and it costs a lot to heal him? And I am also quite physically small and young. I'm strong enough to control the horse and muck him out but if he went crazy I couldn't stop him from taking off. I doubt this would affect the horse, but falling off is more of an issue I guess... Thanks to anyone who answers.

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To start with, keep taking lessons, 4 years is nice but horses are a life long learning experience. Make sure you understand the signs of colic, founder, how to identify thrush, how to perform a pinch test for dehydration, how to properly bandage/wrap a leg. Learn what you need in your first aid kit. Learn what the laws are for traveling with your horse or participating in group rides. Identify what farrier and vet you will be using. Learn the best places to get good hay, find where you will buy feed. Learn proper feeding techniques to keep your horse healthy. Have your instructor help you identify what kind of horse you need (training level/attitude)
You may not believe in stalls or blankets but horses need at least a three sided shelter to get out of the weather. Plan on having $1000 in your emergency fund. Figure out if you really want to commit to an animal for 20 years or so. Make sure you have the funds available to pay for an annual checkup/ vaccination visit from the vet (semi annual is better) plan on your farrier every 6-8 weeks. Figure out where your limits are. Are you willing to invest $5000 for surgery in necessary or would you euthanize?
Take a horse savvy person with you to find your horse. There are a myriad of ways to misrepresent a horse... The easiest being take a high strung, run away kind of horse, ride it to exhaustion, clean it up in time for the buyers appointment and ta da! A nice, quiet horse!
Know what you're looking at when it comes to teeth, not just age but defects like parrot mouth.
If you have a fear of falling off, have your instructor teach you an emergency dismount.
Know that you are commuting to 7/365 care. Doesn't matter if you're sick, it's your birthday or you want to go on vacation. It's much harder to find competent horse sitters than pet sitters. Talk to your instructor about it. They know you better than we do and if they are good, they will give you an honest assessment.

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Thanks. I will make sure to follow your points. Honestly, I can think of no better way to spend a birthday then with my horse. :-) I'm not scared of falling, I'd just prefer to avoid it lol. Thanks for answering and have fun riding. :-)
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Tia, we ALL prefer not to fall! Lol
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If you are actually asking "what if he runs away"... You don't need a horse. Perhaps you will need to invest in FENCING to keep him in the acreage you described..

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I will have a horse safe fence, obviously. I mean if he jumps it or crawls under it. My neighbor's horses go under theirs a lot, even though the bottom is pretty low. I'll make mine lower. I hope that was a joke. :-)
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Horses are extremely expensive. Depending on where you live hay can cost a fortune. You can not expect a horse to live on grass on three acres only...you must supplement with hay....You must have a horse vetted once a year. Shots, coggins test, teeth floated, hooves trimmed, feed costs... Upkeep of fencing, worming.... It all adds up and the vet costs if a horse colics or slices open flesh is very expensive. Please don't get a horse unless you can cover these costs. Too many starving and unhealthy horses out there because there are too many people that don't realize that the upkeep of a horse is VERY EXPENSIVE!!! And yes, they do get sick.
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I can cover the costs. I definetly wouldn't expect to live on three acres worth of grass, especially during the winter. That would be so mean. Do Candian horses need Coggins? ? I've never heard of Candian horses getting it.
Thanks
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If you plan on traveling with this horse you do. It's part of horse ownership. If you can't afford it, don't have a horse
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I can afford everything that horse needs and wants, and if I want to show I will. I know they're expensive. In Canada you don't need a Coggins, it must be British or whatever country you're from. And thanks for just telling me I need a fat wallet to get a horse (Noooooo)
The question was: Am I ready to own a horse, not if I have enough money to keep one (I know I have enough, thank you very much) I meant in level of experience and riding ability.
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Yeah, you don't need a horse. You clearly have no idea what is involved.
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That's pretty judgemental coming from someone who's never even met me. You are acting quite arrogant. Of course you can have a horse, because you're above me. You know nothing about horse ownership requirements where I live. And you don't need a horse either. They're for people's amusement. You need a lesson in humility and kindness. Go ahead, laugh as you read this ad think "Hah hah she's so dumb she thinks she can have a horse I'm so wonderful I can have so many horses. I know exactly what's needed. I'm perfect." If you've never had a horse get loose before you either have had it really easy, or stall your horses 24/7. Or you've just been lucky. It happens. And when I asked this question, I expected answers like "Do you know how to do this, because you should know before you have a horse how to...",
It was just a question.
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Wow, the maturity and self control here are just blowing me away.
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Owning a horse is a large responsibility and if said horse does get ill, you have to be able to pay for it. That is the bottom line. It is not about age but about money and responsibility.

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How much should I keep in my emergency vet fund?
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Several thousand at the minimum. Hope for the best, prepare for the worst.
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Good answer!!
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when my old horse got colic it cost us £7,185 for surgery.
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Ok thanks.
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If you are concerned about him running away, then you should probably invest in some kind of fence to keep him in. As for veterinary costs, you don't have to worry about it because horses don't get sick that often, as long as you keep him well fed and sheltered from the elements. Your physique doesn't have anything to do with ownership.

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What makes you think horses don't get sick that often? There are quite a few vet or other specialist costs involved in keeping a horse. Their feet need to be trimmed, and maybe shod by a shoer; their teeth need to be floated, usually by a vet; they have to have shots; they need to be protected from bugs getting into their eyes, and from biting flies. Of course she'll need to have a fence, horses graze, which means walking a lot.
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Dun, whoever said healthy as a horse lied.
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My husband and I are seriously into horses. He has trained and raised horses since he was knee-high to a milk bottle. I have read your question very carefully and have a few questions: 1. You do have a fence for the horse, right? 2. Can you afford to pay for the vet, the shoer, and whoever else is going to work on your horse (like the person who floats his teeth)? 3. You should probably continue with your riding lessons. Here are my tips, you can stop a horse from running away by pulling one rein around until his nose is almost touching your toe. Hard to run away when you are turning in a circle. Keep him turning until he stops moving. Let his head free the minute he stops moving. Keep him standing still until you say it's time to go, if he moves without being told to do so, one rein his head to your toe. This is the brake and he will not take off with you if you know how to do this. Let me continue below, I hate getting told I've written too many words.

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If you are afraid of falling off a horse, you shouldn't get on one. No matter how well trained a horse is, the odds of falling off or being thrown are pretty good. I am not saying it will happen continually, but it will probably happen occasionally. I have fallen off more times than I care to admit...never been injured as a result of it. Wear your helmet, remember the brake, and ride a good saddle. As with any animal, there is a chance it will become seriously ill and need vet care. You should check with the vet that has been treating the animal you are contemplating buying before you commit to buy. If you buy the horse, you pay for the vet exam, if you do not, you do not pay for it is common in the trade. If the horse has health issues, particularly colic, don't buy it...probably going to be a recurring problem, very painful for the horse and thus for his owner, and can easily be fatal. With proper fencing, your horse will not get out unless it is very determined. With your brake, he won't run away with you. With enough money, you can pay for his physical needs including health care. Give him proper training and he won't go crazy on you. Make sure you get him to "join up" when you start handling him, desensitize him so he'll spook less. I love horses and would have them again if I could afford them. If you can afford them, love the heck out of them, and have fun, they are one of God's greatest gifts to humans.
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Yep, I'll have a horse safe fence for him. I can afford to pay for the vet unless it's some freaky 100,000 dollar illness. Then I would probably have to put him down, but the chances of that happening are pretty rare. And I will continue with them on my horse. I have fallen off a lot it's more of my parent's concerns lol. I've fallen off and been thrown a lot but it's never been because I'm small, more because of a ridding error/ bad tempered horse. Thanks for answering, I really appreciate it. :-)
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Happy, happy, joy, joy! Fly like the wind.
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