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Why do lights flicker when i turn on microwave or drier?

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They must be using a lot of power...maybe they are on a weak part of the house grid or whatever. Try plugging your lights in elsewhere? If its happening throughout the whole house, then you need to ask an electrician, there must be a problem there, and you're in danger of blowing the circuit and this could fry lightbulbs or electronics.

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Agreed. And in worse case scenario it could start an electrical fire in the walls if not properly grounded at plug in, old wires, or improperly hooked to the breaker. Get an electrician who is licensed and bonded to check it out!!
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because it takes energy from the breaker then the breaker can't take it so the braker takes it from the other appliance, but that's a guess

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Your light flicking when you turn on a microwave or drier means that the lights are on the same circuit as the appliance. You should try to separate the circuit because it is being overloaded. Go to http://www.ehow.com/info_8100192_causes-house-lights-dim.html for more information.

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Short circuit! A lot of power running through your house!

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You main beaker is to small and pulling a lot of amps may nead at least 150-200amp beaker !

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The lights and the microwave are on the same branch circuit that may be 15 amps or 20 amps rated. Microwaves require 11 to 14 amps to operate properly and that creates a surge when it's energized, therefore, the lights are momentarily starved of sufficient power and flicker. When the power stabilizes the lights come to full brightness again. All it means is that the microwave needs to be on a dedicated circuit by it's self like the National Electrical Code requires.

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