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Can my Supervisor tell me I have to document when and where I eat lunch? Unpaid 30 mins. I am the only 1 in the dept. required to note it.

I just want to find resources to support that my boss can or cannot make me document my unpaid lunch.

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Sounds a little fishy to me. Speaking of fish, maybe you should bring him back the #2 combo from Long John Silvers...He could just be a little hungry and cranky...

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Lol
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You may have to find out if you have a right to rest breaks. If you do not have the right to rest breaks, then he/she can interrupt it because he/she is "giving" it to you. The unpaid meal breaks should be at least 20 minutes long.

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It doesn't sound right to me. However~if you have an Employee HandBook YOU should give that a deep look into before doing or making any kind of move.

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Are you a union member? If not, that is a shame because this is just the sort of unreasonable thing that you should ask your union rep to help you deal with your boss on.

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It sounds totally unreasonable. If he wants to know where you are prior to lunch and afterwards, that is different. Where you go on your lunch break is, as you stated, unpaid time. Do they want to know what you ate for lunch too?

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Not totally unreasonable ... see my answer for why.
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Ok Walt. I will look for your answer as to why I should document for my manager, and why anyone else might be expected to do the same, where and how I spent my unpaid lunch break eat day.
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In the State where I live it is the LAW that you get (at least) a 30 minute lynch break after 4 hours of work. It is also the law that you get two 20 minute breaks each day. Why this jerk expects you to "report" how, where, and when you took your break could be unlawful.
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YES ... your boss can demand that you document when you take your meal/rest periods. Even if nobody else is required to do so.

This is because the employer has to prove the employee took the breaks. So if there is, or has been, a question of whether or not you took those breaks - it is in the employer's best interest to be able to prove whether you did or not. And maybe they only require it of you ... because you are the only one the question has been raised about.

As to documenting WHERE you eat it ... that is likely to prove that you did not eat at your workstation. Since if you eat at your workstation, the state can claim that you didn't get a meal break (since you weren't relieved of work duties).

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It is the part of where I took my break that is bothering to me. Not one other person has to note where they take their break. No employee has to clock in and out for lunch. It is assumed that we all take a lunch unless it is noted that we did not for some reason. I am just being singled out for some reason.
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By the way, a majority of our staff eats lunch at their desk. It is just odd to me to single one person out. I am well aware of the location being and issue for being paid for working through lunch.
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I agree that it is more than odd for one employee to be singled out. What if you spent your free time outside in the sunshine? Or in the ladies' room? Asking you to document where you spent you free time is totally unreasonable, other than what Walt mentions in his answer here. It would be like asking you to report where you went AFTER work each day!
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It is odd ... but as I state in my answer, perhaps Cameron is singled out because somebody said something.

I think that may be the case, because we have a similar situation where I work. One nurse mentioned that she wasn't getting her breaks and "had to" eat at her desk, and suggested she was going to file a claim with the state. So now she is required to log all her breaks, so the employer has evidence to either refute or confirm her claim.

(remember, employers are assumed guilty of violations unless they can prove otherwise)
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NO they can't if you're NOT being paid it's your time. however by law you are NOT entitled to a meal break untill you have worked 8 hrs. hungry employees produce less in work models so they haven't changed the practice YET.

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Never heard about THAT rule of not being enititled to a meal break until AFTER 8 hrs of work ... not anywhere in North America. THAT is not even logical considering most shifts ARE 8 hrs.

Typcially a 30 minute meal break is mandatory for a employee that works more than 5 hrs in a row.
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Walt oreagun's answer is spot on. you didn't say if you've asked your sup why you're required to do this. that would be the first thing I'd have done. I am a supervisor and in the type of work I do I need to know where people are taking their breaks for safety reasons

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There is once again more to this story. Perhaps you have been leaving early or returning late? First question are you unionized? Second has there been verbal or written counseling on this prior to the writing request? You need to look up the break policy for your job. Each department has a policy and procedure manual which is available to all employees. If it is unpaid it does not mean you always get to leave the facility, you may be considered "on call" unless the supervisor agrees to you leaving.

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This position is not unionized. We are all allowed to leave the facility for our lunches and it is not noted in our handbook at all. We are allowed 30 minutes unpaid lunch. There has not been any concern or counseling over this issue with the employee. No question about leaving early or returning late. Although, there are several exempt salary personnel that take 2 hours every single day. Also, we are all well aware of the fact that you are not to eat at your desk. However, at our company you can eat at your desk. It is only assumed you are taking a 30 minute unpaid lunch unless otherwise noted on the time card. Then you will get paid overtime for not taking a lunch. We have Supervisors that interrupt lunch and we don't get paid for it either. This position is not on call either.
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And the salary exempt do not work over or come in early or weekends either. So, save that argument.
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I did not say handbook I said policy and procedure manual 2 totaly different things. You are making conflicting statements here. Have you asked the supervisor why the documentation and why only you? Sometimes it is a simple as revision of policy and procedure and they reference the most reliable to get the info they need to do this. But based on what you just said there is anger so I doubt it.
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I am not the employee being asked to document it. Our company does not have any policy and procedure manual that relates to these items. Our handbook states we are entitled to two 15 min. breaks paid and one 30 minute lunch unpaid.
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I will relay the information to get it in writing from the Supervisor why he is being asked to document this information. Thanks for the input.
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Then start with the obvious and ask why.
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Typically a 30 minute meal break is mandatory for a employee that works more than 5 hrs in a row.

If you are being required to document your breaks (and no one else is), my guess is it's because there is some sort of issue or argument about your taking breaks. This practice is specific to YOU, and the documentation will help satisfy any argument about time spent away from your post.

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