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Does the Pope ( Benedict XVI ) remains infallible after retirement?

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He was a RELIGIOUS LEADER.
I think you need to look up the definition of infallible.

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He's considered infallible??? really?

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Really, sadly enough tbe Catholucs believe the pope is pure, holy, sinless, perfect and infallible - the embodiment of God Himself on earth, Gods mouthpiece to them. Everything he says is direct from God Himself.
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tis sad
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That is a protestant misconception. We don't believe he's infallible in the terms of sin, or perfection. Of course he sins. Of course he isn't perfect - only God is. Catholics believe his infallibility extends only to matters of faith and morals, and it can operate only when he is defining something pertaining to faith or morals for the whole church.
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The bible defines faith and morals. So, you've lost me with this concept.
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Pope Benedict will no longer be considered infallible. His hold on the Stability will fall following his retirement and he himself said that he will be "hidden from the world".

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The pope isnt infallible ever. Hes just a man, human, totally fallible and sinful like all humans. Catholucs delude themselves - or the papacy and catholic hierarchy delude them - with these blasphemous lies.

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JamesKaeberle

No pope is infallible.


Romans 3:21-26

21 But now the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed, being witnessed by the Law and the Prophets, 22 even the righteousness of God, through faith in Jesus Christ, to all and on all who believe. For there is no difference; 23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, 24 being justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, 25 whom God set forth as a propitiation by His blood, through faith, to demonstrate His righteousness, because in His forbearance God had passed over the sins that were previously committed, 26 to demonstrate at the present time His righteousness, that He might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus.

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Popes are just men , no more, no less.

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I'm not sure whether or not he retains infallibility when he retires. However, many people here seem to misunderstand how the pope is infallible.
Contrary to what the people above think, the pope is not "totally infallible." His infallibility extends only to matters of faith and morals, and it can operate only when he is defining something pertaining to faith or morals for the whole church.
Infallibility is a special gift God gave to the Church to protect it from teaching as true what is, in fact, false. It is a special protection to ensure that the Faith will not be distorted by error. (My answer continues in the comments)

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The pope does not have a "hotline" to God. He must get his doctrine the same way we do - he must pray and study. Infallibility means that only after he has prayed and studied, and when he defines something as part of the Catholic faith, the Holy Spirit protects what he teaches from being wrong (Lk 22:31-31). It refers to his function as the official teacher, not as a private person, nor even as a private theologian. Thus, not everything the pope writes or says about the faith is considered infallible.
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In fact, all the bishops of the Church in union with the pope share this gift. They are protected from teaching error when they meet in a council to define a matter of faith or morals, or when or when, scattered throughout the world, they agree on how a matter or faith or morals is to be definitively held (Mt 18:18).
Because it applies.only to matters of faith or morals, the gift of infallibility does not mean the pope should know about the winning lottery numbers. Nor is he guaranteed to correctly predict the winner of the Super Bowl.
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Also, infallibility is not inspiration. This means that the pope is not automatically given the proper words with which to teach. Infallibility is a 'negative protection.' It is like a guardrail along a mountain highway. It keeps the pope from "going over the edge" into teaching error. The Holy Spirit will never allow the pope to teach as truth something that is actually false.
Sometimes infallibility is confused with "impeccability," which is the idea that the pope is sinless or cannot sin. This is not what infallibility means. A pope could live a seriously sinful life, as a few popes have yet his teaching would still be protected by the Holy Spirit. This is the point of infallibility - to protect the Church's teaching from error. A pope may even end up in hell for having a sinful life, but his teaching would still have been protected by the Holy Spirit.
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Here are the conditions necessary for infallible teaching by the pope:

1. The makes it clear that he is exercising his supreme ' ex cathedra' authority. ('ex cathedra is Latin for "from the chair" and refers to the pope's office as universal pastor and teacher of the faith.)
2. He is defining a matter pertaining to faith of morals.
3. The pope uses terms that make it clear he is rendering an infallible judgment.
4. He is addressing the whole Church, not just a part of it.
5. He makes it clear that his teaching binds the consciences of the faithful.

Hope this helps! - ManOfKnowledge
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MAN OF KNOWLEDGE, so happy you're back, excellent answer, and clarification! Why the long absence? Was it something we said? Later.
Frank
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Man of Knowledge has given an excellent explanation of papal infallibility; but to answer your question, when Benedict XVI's resignation becomes effective, at 8:00 P.M., on February 28, 2013, Rome time, he will no longer be Pope, so will no longer be infallible, as an individual, but he will share in the infallibility, of all of the Bishops, when they act with and under (Latin: cum et sub) the Pope, to teach the whole Church, in any matter of faith or morals, which happened most recently during the Second Ecumenical Vatican Council (Vatican Council II), 1962-1965, which means that it was the second such council to take place, in the Vatican, at Rome, Italy, specifically, in the Sistine Chapel, where Michelangelo Bonarati's famous paintings adorn the ceiling. I hope this helps to fully answer your question.
Frank
P.S. When only some of the Bishops so act with and under the Pope, as during a Synod, they act under his infallibility, not their own. Frank

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Thank you for clarifying that, my answer was only to give a clear explanation of what the pope's infallibility actually is, as most people here misunderstand this doctrine.
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Which you did remarkably well considering ... !
Frank
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Being a member of the human race makes every person fallible and subject to error. Being in a position or office is no promise or guarantee of infallibility. A simple examination of RC history proves that (e.g. indulgences). A simple examination of the Jewish Pharisees, the religious authorities of their time also shows the danger of thinking position means infallible. Jesus revealed their hypocrisy and error in moral issues and teaching on numerous occasions. Man is not, and never has been, infallible.

It is so ironic that the very doctrine of papal infallibility is a clear example of fallibility. That doctrine is responsible for so much error, it is tragic. Talk about fallibility--that is it. That is why James said "not many of you should presume to be teachers, knowing they will face stricter judgment." Yes, we will be all be held accountable for how we handle God's Word.

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Hello I just wanna say I'm tooish. My account got messed up so I got a different one and yep this is me:3

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Srry didn't answer your question hehe:3
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