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ThomasNjobvu

Which religion believes in the book of the Law and what exactly is the book of Law? i wanna hear your views people.

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Islam believes in the book of law fixed by Almighty Allah and the book of Allah is
Quran Majeed .

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good answer
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Thanks.......! This means that you are Muslim .
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no -_-
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Sorry but I asked dawnbright .
Anyways no prob !
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loool
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Hahaha lol !
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Actually no. no I am not. BUT i know a good answer when i read one. Yours was clear, thoughtful and truthful.
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yes yes it wazzzz XD
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Thanks both of youuuuuu ! :)
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Hi, Esabelgriplin!
I liked your answer, too, but I'm not Muslim, either.
The Quran is a beautiful book, and many people of other religions have also read and appreciated its poetry, laws, and ideas. Many of the same laws are found to be common to a lot of other religions, which seems like a good thing to me.
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I did not under stand....................................................XD
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@chou - excellent response. Great way to think. I would star but can't on comments
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Aw, thanks dawnbright!
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Thanks chouetteraccoon for appreciating my answer and for showing respect to Quran .....!
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xD
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i dont know te religion but the book of law is where All the law in the united stats are put in one book :) Wikipedia.com

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all religions are very old and not amended from time to time due ti various reasons -what you are required is to follow the law of land-if you are a citizen follow the law as per the the countries constitution -obey the traffic rules- obey rules while you are working or studying obey the laws while paying your taxes etc etc -this is the religion which according me one should follow and this will bring salvation////////////////////

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Islam and Hebrew. The book of Allah, and there there is the Mitzvot Hebrew 613 comandments. NOT 10. These books and laws delve in everything from proper eating digestion health,family and rolls of each member, to how to conduct fair business.

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A Buddhist told me they use the book of law and by the look of things, he is living by the Law " Do what thou wilt" Totally misleading.
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Esabelgriplin & RobertTyrrell: Honestly can you explain this. how many books of the Law are there, i Google the book of the law there are 75 Laws
surprisingly it ends by saying

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.
The study of this Book is forbidden. It is wise to destroy this copy after the first reading.
Whosoever disregards this does so at his own risk and peril. These are most dire.

Those who discuss the contents of this Book are to be shunned by all, as centres of pestilence.

All questions of the Law are to be decided only by appeal to my writings, each for himself.

There is no law beyond Do what thou wilt.

Love is the law, love under will.

The priest of the princes,

Ankh-f-n-khonsu

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You didn't ask me, specifically, but I recognize that, I believe.
Isn't that from Aleister Crowley's Book of Laws (written in 1904), that he alleges was authored by an entity named "Aiwass", while he was visiting the Gaza Pyramids in Egypt? The name Ankh-ef-en-Khonsu appears on a stele (tablet) there.
Can I "explain it", as you asked?
Um, no, and I wouldn't presume to try.
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That makes sense en ya you can, its like there are different books of Laws
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You want to hear Our views?
That's good, because there really isn't one answer to that question.
_Most_ religions have a book of Laws, including (but not limited to) Islam (Quran), Judaism (Torah), Christianity (Bible), Hindu (Manu Samhita) -- (and I hope I spelled all the names right) -- and many others.
These laws usually dictate (or at least advise about) many areas of human life, like diet, societal codes, criminal codes, education, trade, parental and filial responsibilities, marital codes and responsibilities, and so on.
These religious Books of Laws have also been used as the basis for civil laws and governments around the world.
I'm often amazed at how basically alike these guidelines or laws usually are, with the differences sometimes directly relatable to the best ways to survive in the area where those Laws arose, or were communicated by the diety.
But since we're all human, and have the same needs and desires, and our differences are simply cultural and environmental, I guess it's not that surprising.

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I like your comment which you submit on my answer that's why I am giving you helpful star here :)
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Thank you! :D
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No prob :)
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I am not sure if you are referring to the ancient Egyptian Book/Code of Laws! All the commandments that are good among the Hebrew Ten Commandments were contained in that Book of Law at least 3000 years before Moses WROTE ONE SOLO word of the Jewish Ten Commandments. A significant portion of the Pentateuch had been copied, interpreted or forged from that book.

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I'm not sure I understand what specific book you mean?
It's my understanding that no complete set of laws survives from ancient Egypt -- that what has survived and been discovered (so far) are just royal decrees and administrative decisions and dispatches, as found on bits of papyrus or fragments of stones or tablets. In other words, not a specific "Book of Laws".
Do you have more info?
I'm curious. :)
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According to Wikipedia: "Some historians....have argued that the Ten Commandments originated from ancient Egyptian religion, and postulate that the Biblical Jews borrowed the concept after their Exodus from Egypt. Chapter 125 of the [Egyptian] Book of the Dead (a.k.a. the Papyrus of Ani) includes a list of things to which a man must swear in order to enter the afterlife. These sworn statements bear a remarkable resemblance to the Ten Commandments in their nature and their phrasing.....The Book of the Dead has additional requirements, and, of course, doesn't require worship of Yahweh."

The Book of the Dead was written circa 1800 BCE. 2 The Schofield Reference Bible estimates that the Hebrew Exodus from Egypt and the provision of the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai occurred in 1491 BCE., some three centuries later. Many religious liberals, historians, and secularists have concluded that the Hebrew Scripture's Ten Commandments were based on this earlier document, rather than vice-versa.
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Ok, I see. It was your "3000 years before" statement that threw me. I guess that was a typo and you meant 300 years.
However, there are quite a few Egyptian "Books of the Dead" but they are not books of laws for the living, like the Bible/Quran etc. They are more in the vein of the Tibetan Book of the Dead, in that they are not intended for the living, but are spells texts placed in tombs to help the dead make their journey in the world of the afterlife. Btw, the age for the Papyrus of Ani is about 1240 BC. There are some older ones, although some have different spell texts (they are generally personalized for the dead person they are placed with).
--- The only book of laws (for the living) I know of that was even close to that "3000 years before" age is the Code of Ur-Nammu, which is only 2100-2050 BC but is Sumerian, not Egyptian, and that's still only a few hundred years older. (Which is why I was curious what you meant.)
Anyway, thanks for the info. :)
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The Jewish Religion. They mainly believe in the old testament. The main belief system is in the Torah or the first 5 books if the Bible. It is the Law.
They learn about a Holy God. And willingly desire to please God... Not man.

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If you're refering to The Laws Of Moses, then Judaism follows them.
Christians are under the Law Of Love.

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