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What are some ways to improve gas mileage while driving?

specifically for a '92 ford f150. about 89,000 miles on it

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tire air levels coolant and use the restroom before hand it takes away weight allowing the car to run smoother

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good
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overtaker

If it's a manual, keep the rpms low.... 8)

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Drive the speed limit and make sure you have proper air in the tires. A tune up won't hurt ether. A few dollars now will save alot down the road.

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Drive the speed limit or lower.

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Don't drive too aggressively.

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good answer but write something more
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obviously, dont wanna get a ticket
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drive slowly and keep the speed limit slow

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Go slow, and coast as much as you can.

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I just traded a '95 F-150 w/ 6-cylinder & automatic. The best I ever saw on mine was around 17mpg. Ease away from stops gently (as tho you are trying not to crack a egg under the pedal) until you get up to about 20 mph. At other times accelerate gently & as slowly as traffic behind you will allow. I do it on a 2010 Mercury Milan 4-cylinder & it helps get the reading up by 1-2 MPG on a tankful. If you have a manual trans, upshift as soon as you are able without lugging too much. Keep speed at 60 mph or lower. Good luck with your efforts.

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thank you. very helpful
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To begin, don't accelerate hard, don't brake hard (allowing coasting) and keep your tires inflated to specification.Then keep your care well tuned. This does not have to be expensive. Change the spark plugs, air filter and fuel filter as needed and pour some fuel injector cleaner into the gas tank (when you are about to fill) once maybe twice a year if you've never done it. I myself also add a carbon cleaner once a year (Seafoam). Lastly, don't downshift unless you really need to and travel the routes with the fewest stop lights, though they may be longer in distance.

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great great answer thank you
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Acceleration is a big problem with fuel saving. slowly going onto the peddle instead of mashing it helps a lot Tire pressure is a big gain to, make sure your tires are properly inflated. Remove all unnecessary weight from the car. by doing this you create less strain on the motor meaning less gas use. Now under the hood, A clean air filter will save you a lot as well as a good working exhaust allowing for good flowing air through the motor. Making sure your vehicle idle level is set proper can make a big difference. if you idle at 2 thousand RPM's, your burning to much gas. Set it down lower. Also dont let your vehicle idle on a cold morning. Letting the vehicle warm up so you dont have to be cold is a waste of gas. Last of all, drive 55. driving 55mph instead of 65mph may increase your mpg by up to 15% which is a big difference! For more car tips and tricks or any questions you need from skilled techs, visit www.wesleysyard.weebly.com and go to the "Contact Us" page. Were available 24/7 for your automotive questions and needs.

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BEST answer. thank you very much
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One quick note idling on a cold morning. Don't just pull out and start driving normally either as this will decrease the life expectancy of the engine. Start-ups and the first few minutes are where an overwhelming amount of engine wear occur. Burning a little gas here will keep the expense of a new car farther away. Warm it up for no more than a minute and drive slowly the first three minutes to remove the water vapors from the oil. Once the engine is no longer cold you can drive normally. Good luck
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Actually thats a very popular myth about engines. This was mostly based on cars that were manufactured before 1985. Those engines needed warming up before drove because it could cause damage to the motor otherwise. For him having a 92 ford, these motors are designed to be started up and immediately put into drive.
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You dont have to warm it up completely, you warm it up while driving slower initially. But I would not just pull out and hit the gas on a cold engine if interested in its longevity.
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it stalls ALL THE TIME when i try to start it after i havent driven it in a couple days, or if its cold, then just after like 30 minutes or so and the only way to keep it running is to keep my foot on the gas while it idles
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Could be a blockage in the air intake, dirty injectors, timing needing adjustment, unadjusted valves... and more. You want to try the least expensive options first (first ones here) to rule that out. Try the advise given in this topic regarding changing filters and using cleaning agents.
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ok i will
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among what others have stated a clean air filter, tune up in a bottle or stp, keep the tank at full(always top it off.) don't overload your car with stuff, turn ac/heat off.

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Agree with turning A/C off (although you can't live in the southeast without A/C) but heater doesn't add any drag to engine. The A/C unit on the other hand takes some HP to run.
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I've explored and experimented with this in different vehicles (I'm a mechanic) there are three main strategies, other than maintenance, that can be exercised while driving to improve gas mileage. The first is when accelerating watch your RPMs try to keep them under 2000. anything over that and you should release the gas to allow the car to shift gears. Anything over that is wasting power on RPMs instead of putting it to the road. The second strategy is Avoid idling and coasting. you should have the gas pressed so that you are constantly accelerating at the same rate that friction is decelerating you. allow it accelerate more down hills and less up hills. gaining speed downhill and loose it uphill. The third strategy is to avoid breaking. Don't accelerate so much that it becomes necessary to break to maintain the speed limit. If approaching a red light simply coast to the light and slow down at a constant pace instead of approaching and then breaking when near the light. All of these are based on not wasting energy from a physics perspective. Coasting wastes gas due to the gas requires to idle is being wasted instead of accelerating as well as all the momentum lost during breaking.

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Very good answer!
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thank you :)
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Excellent answer! Jack rabbit starts and constant acceleration - deceleration also give me motion sickness. Maybe the nausea is related to knowing what the cost will be at the pump! ;)
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I have a 2000 Ford F150, 4x4, and the best I get in town is 16 mpg. On the highway, it gets about 18 mpg. While driving, I coast downhill, and let it ease uphill. I don't mash the gas way down going uphill.
The faster the RPM's, the more gas any car or truck will use. So, I rarely drive over 55, even on an Interstate highway.......everything passes me, but I don't care....I am getting better gas milage than doing 60 or 65.
I even tried driving with the tailgate down, hoping the wind resistance difference might give better milage, but it didn't! Surprise. Good luck.
PS. I have an automatic transmission....don't want another manual!

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actually mythbusters did a segment on tailgates and gas mileage, and it turns out it can actually decrease your mileage by putting it down. The cab and tail gate cause an eddy to occur in the bed of the truck that reduces wind resistance, and lowering the tail gate increases drag on the rear of the vehicle. This may not be true of all vehicles but is most likely true of most.
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my dad tells me it used to get about 17 mpg max but now i figure its getting about 15 at best
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Mostly, it's accelerating gently, making sure tires are inflated (or a little over the sticker on the door frame), clean air filter. I have a 97 Saturn and get the best mileage at about 60-65 mph, driving at CONSTANT THROTTLE (not constant speed). Yes I've seen 45 mpg on a trip where the window sticker stated 40 mpg highway.
Higher speeds cut mpg a LOT. I think it's a fourth power law. Like driving 10% faster increases air drag 40%. Air drag and weight are your enemies. MIght even try narrower tires.
Your F150 has a large frontal area and I'm guessing high coefficient of drag. Not a lot you can do there unfortunately.

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it actually has one of those truck cover things over the bed, so that might do something for the drag. would u recommend keeping that on?
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Years ago, when nearly everyone in So Cal had 80's Toyota and Datsun pick ups, some physicist analyzed whether to remove or leave on the tailgate, some people would drive empty and even leave the tailgate down. It turned out that leaving the tailgate up (with no bed cover) was same as removing the tailgate, a "bubble" of air formed in the truck bed.
As for a bed cover, I would think that is a help to you, it is a smooth surface compared to the lumpy truck bed (with wheel wells etc.)
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thank you very much!
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