Submit a question to our community and get an answer from real people.
Submit

Replace copper pipes or repipe?

Water is coming out dirty - I think it's pretty unhealthy for me to drink it. What are your opinions on repiping vs replacing pipes? The latter is more expensive and would require breaking down some of the walls, but should I trust repiping? Does anyone know where to get information for this?

Report as

I work for a plumbing company. We do repipes and repairs daily.
A repipe *is* replacing your pipes.
-
They will start at the water's service entrance for the cold water and at the water heater for the hot water.
The new pipes should be type-L or better (check with your city to what is code). The new pipe will typically be run through the walls and attic to refeed the fixtures throughout the house. There should be a minimal amount of drywall & paint repair, and they should guarantee this work for at least 10 years.
-
The old pipes will be abandoned and the water will no longer he connected to them so they can stay under the slab or wherever they are currently located.
-
Be sure to get referrals from people you trust.

Helpful Fun Thanks for voting Comments (12)
Report as
If you only repair or replace the one line, you will need to do the others soon after. Sounds like your pipes are at the end if their life-span.
Report as
How long is that pipespan?
Report as
Pipe span? Do you mean life-span? Galvanized pipes typically last about 30 years or so. We do a lot of repipes on houses where the galvanized pipes are more than 50 yo which pretty good considering we are in earthquake territory.
Copper if done correctly should last at least 30 years or more, but that will also depend on how corrosive the water is, ground movement if they are under the slab, and the quality of the work. New houses have a plastic liner over the pipes in the ground. It is supposed to help prevent minerals in the soil from affecting the pipe.
Report as
In Cali they started using copper in the 70s. We have not needed to do many repipes on these houses.....yet.
Houses built before then has galvanized pipes. We have a lot of homes in our area that are 80-100 yo.
I am figuring that the number of homes built with copper pipes will be needing repipes in the next 10 years or so.
Report as
My house was built in 68. I somehow doubt it's been repiped. [/:^(
Report as
So you will be looking into having a repipe done in the next 10 to 20 years. If your pipes are in good condition and your water is not corrosive (or the soil the pipes may run in -- acidic soil eats away at the pipe from the outside), then you may be okay for awhile longer. It freezes up there so your plumbing/building codes are going to be different than here.

Report as
It sounds expensive. Is it?
Report as
In Cali a two bathroom house with a laundry room can run between $2500 to $3500 for the cold (more to feed than the hot), then add about $2000 to $2500 more for the hot if done at the same time as the cold. Some companies charge more.
If it is a simple straight run, then of course it is much much less.
It will also depend on what and where they will have to run the new pipe. We did a house recently that had a fancy molded ceiling, so we could not run the line through the ceiling space. We had to install a chase (casing) for the new pipe and we had to match it to the ceiling design. Of course that will run you more than a straight forward job.
Report as
But then you will not have to worry about a plumbing leak for about 30 years or more.
Report as
I do not like what I'm hearing here, Yos.
Report as
Sorry Nov.........
Report as
Sorry Nov.........
Report as
Add a comment...
ClaraListensprechen

I've seen a lot of that in my own 60 years on this planet, and both copper and galvanized pipes are guilty.

When dirt in your water is generated by your pipelines, expect a gushing leak before long because this indicates severe corrosion which will eventually make the pipe walls too thin to hold up to water pressure.

Replacement is the better option, but make sure of where it's that badly corroded. You might not have to replace all piping, unless you want to be "on the safe side" because you don't want to do that kind of work in the near future on the pipes you leave alone.

Helpful Fun Thanks for voting Comments (0)
Report as
Add a comment...

The dirt is probably as a result of patina in the copper pipes and the best option would be to replace the pipes. In addition, another reason why the pipes should be replaced is because the old pipes restrict water flow. You can get more details at http://www.plumbitnow.com/plumbing/when-should-i-repipe-my-home/index.html.

Helpful Fun Thanks for voting Comments (0)
Report as
Add a comment...

Are you talking about relining? Replacing or relining makes your question make more sense since it avoids breaking down walls. Here is a FAQ page on relining: http://www.restoremypipes.com/about/faqs and then ask again if you need to re-formulate your question.

Helpful Fun Thanks for voting Comments (0)
Report as
Add a comment...
Do you have an answer?
Answer this question...
Did you mean?
Login or Join the Community to answer
Popular Searches