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There's a phrase"to put out to sea". What to say when the water is not sea but lake or river?"He put out"-is it clear that he went on water?

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You really don't want to just say "he put out", it has an entirely different meaning. In slang terms it refers to someone who is sexually active.

As far as "to put out to sea", don't know that you would really use that in terms of someone on a lake or river, you'd be more likely to say "he went sailing", or they went boating".

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"He put out" is forgot then! :) Only one more question, please: Does'n "he went sailing/boating" means that it is for fun. I mean that sy goes swhere with an aim.
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He shoved-off

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You could say:
~~left the shore
~~set adrift
~~went into the lake or river
~~went boating

There really is no term like "out to sea" when referring to a lake or river

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Can I say "went into the water" if I don't know what kind of water?
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Sure, but that also sounds like they went swimming or under water. Are they in a boat or some type of vessel?
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Little boat, and rowing. And with the aim to get somewhere.
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They set a course ?
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It's funny, sorry, I don't know if it's your suggestion or you ask this to tell me a proper suggestion. Really bad English. Okay, whole situation, but don't ask why, it's complicated: I would like to express that somebody starts from swhere to swhere. And without the word boat or anything similar, however it should be clear that he starts with some vehicle.
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And shore isn't good becuse it refers to lake, but it may also be river. I'll go crazy. :)
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"They set a course for... " is a really good one in that case.

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I meant "shore off".
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You can say:

" they left (insert name of where they are leaving from) and set a course for (insert name of destination) "
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Perfect! Thanks for both of you!
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to both of you, I think.
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Welcome
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Double connotation. First, "laid to rest" or "let go". Referencing the ebb and flow of the tide of the ocean. The burial of someone while out at sea. Secondly, let go from a position of employment.

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ClaraListensprechen
Excellent--star. And to which I might add, "sailed off into the sunset". :)
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Thanks, to "The Island" hopefully.
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sent to his or her's death bed!

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To sail or to set sail is universal terms used for a nautical journey on lake or by sea, it does not matter what kind of boat or ship it is, no sails are necessary. Ocean liners have sailing schedules as well as fishing charters on lakes.

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