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Is it true that An element that has two outer electrons seeks to gain six more

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waldorff

It depends.... If I remember correctly, for many atoms two electrons in a shell can be stable. I believe there are examples of atoms with a two- electron shell and an outer shell with more electrons. I guess I should look this up..

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It's hydrogen I believe, it's the only one that's full at two.
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waldorff
I believe the first shell is always full at two. All heavier elements have electrons in subsequent shells. This is certainly true for Li, Be, B, C...all the way to Argon with 2-8-8.
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Lol, yes, but hydrogen is full at two, period, it never goes past the first level.
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waldorff
Hydrogen has only one electron - that's why it takes two atoms of hydrogen to combine with oxygen (2-8-6) to form water.

You are thinking of Helium, which has two and is inert.
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But it's full at two, not at eight like majority of the others. I was thinking of hydrogen.
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Yes, eight valence electrons is what it aims for.

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