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How Big, How fast, and how dense does an object have to be to create a gravitational pull.

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Anything with mass has a gravitational attraction to anything else with mass. However, with the difference in mass between your body and the earth, you won't ever notice your gravitational attraction. Also note that gravitation affects non-mass things, such as light, or any other portion of the electro-magnetic spectrum.

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If you observe the reaction of objects to your own body, when you're in a pool (or tub) ... you see that even your own body has a gravitational pull.

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Actually, what you are observing here is surface tension, which creates a pull on objects. But since the difference between your mass and the mass of the other object, you don't see much attraction. There is also gravitational attraction, but at that scale it is almost unobservable.
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I am with Bam on this one even the small waves in a pool or the slightest breeze would easily overcome any gravitational forces between us and anything that can fit in a pool. just the friction of an object on the water would overcome those forces.
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Shhhhhh ... I was merely using the simple scenario based on the fact that most people asking questions on here wouldn't know the difference ... and wouldn't care.
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every object has some sort of gravitational pull the problem is that so does everything else and the weight, friction, and other outside factors stop these gravitational pulls from having any noticable effect.

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In space? Tiny. Even dust particles attracted each other and clumped into pebbles, then stones, then rocks, then boulders, eventually forming our planet.

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If we are talking about pulling daily objects around, for instance the gravitational pull of the Earth makes objects gain 9.8 m/s more speed for each second of the falling. This is not enough to make the pulling moves we see in movies.
What needs to be pointed out is that Earth for instance doesn't create one gravitational force, each particle has its own. Which means all gravitational force doesn't pull you right through the center. That is why if a planet would be denser and smaller, the gravitational pull would be much higher.
But the density of atoms has limitations. More atoms would live you with a bigger planet with the same surface gravity. At most Jupiter for instance creates only two times more gravity than Earth.
Even in that case the size of planets has limitations because at some point the density at the middle would start nuclear reactions which makes the stars. Stars have density limitations too because the heat from the nuclear reactions would force the matter to expand. That's why even though the Sun is 330000 times heavier than the Earth it has a surface gravity of only 28 times more. about 274m/s^2
But that would be enough speed to make the movie effects.

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