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Why the plural form of human is humans, why not 'humen' like men?

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Dear Deepjyoti,

I agree with PassageOne...even though 'human' and 'man' sound like they should share the same origin, they do not.

HUMAN originates with the Latin humanus, related to homo as in Homo sapiens...while 'man' derives from the Sanskrit 'manu.'

Manu was the name of the first man in Hindu mythology, somewhat parallel to the Western Adam of Adam and Eve fame.

Although I cannot locate it online now, I also seem to recall that MANU itself originated from our amazing ability to use our hands for such intricate chores, giving rise to forms like "manual dexterity," and so forth.

Anyway, in the process of making its way from Sanskrit India to present-day English, MAN passed through the German form Mann, where the plural was menn - and voila, that plural form stuck!

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Straight to my Ask file. Thanks...
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Wow Virginia! Good stuff!
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Word origins...etymology...a special favorite of mine, John and Dozy...almost taught a class in it once! (Never quite happened, though...)
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I guess Mann/Menn came to England via the anglo-saxons, but human came via the Normans.
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You sent me to the Internet, John-O...and I learned that the Eighth-century monk Bede wrote that the Angles, one of those Germanic tribes who became the Anglo-Saxons, actually came en masse, leaving their homeland in Germany, Angeln, empty!

Might be some of my own ancestors; my surname, Hoyt, is an old Anglo-Saxon term said to mean "riotous laughter."
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And it's still with us, Virginia. In modern (American) terminology, you'd be a hoot.
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Oh I never made that connection before Dozy, that is perfect!!!
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Riotously laughing...
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For the same reason that the plural of "is" is "are" instead of "isis."

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I think it has to do with the origin of the word. Man comes from the Old English word "man" but human comes from the Old English word "humain".

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Many words don't follow the rules of the English language.

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The English language has so many properties, leaving many exceptions.

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sounds better

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Ya its something like nothing in the english language

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It's an interesting thought, Deeply. I guess that would make "hymen" a plural word, but what then would be the singular? . However, for the most appropriate answer I refer you to VirginiaLH's fine response.

Some years ago there was a complaint to a Sydney newspaper about the use of "female" because it contained "male". The writer suggested using "feperson". A couple of days later another writer suggested that "feperson" was also sexist because it contained "son" and preferred "feperoffspring".

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