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Is there a website that shows current axial tilt of the earth?

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The axial tilt (or obliquity) varies only a little. Over the last 5 million years, the obliquity of the ecliptic (or more accurately, the obliquity of the Equator on the moving ecliptic of date) has varied from 22.0425 degrees to 24.5044 degrees, but for the next one million years, the range will be only from 22.2289 degrees to 24.3472 degrees. Source: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axial_tilt
The notion of a severe tilt change is an Internet hoax that has been going around. It's obviously false, as such a tilt change would result in extreme daylight cycle changes as well as weather changes. Check snopes.com to investigate such hoaxes.

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In particular, the conspiracy site abovetopsecret.com has been shown to repeatedly post dubious and non-factual hoaxes. This is often the nature of conspiracy sites which are not moderated by scientists. My observation of the odd ideas posted there is that they are usually easily refuted by elementary science.
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I understand about milankovitch cycles and the varying nature. Someone must keep track of it or the gps wouldn't work.
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Not necessarily. Read the article at http://www.uwgb.edu/dutchs/PSEUDOSC/49Degrees.HTM
After reading, see if your questions are still relevant.
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Yes, there are sites you may visit to see the current axial tilt of the earth. You can abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread597829/pg1. Some people say that it is a fixed and unchanging situation of 23.5 degrees.

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The site you are directing to is part of the Internet hoax and you may wish to check the facts before you cite it.
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It's not an arguable subject with debatable sides. No one in science says it is a fixed, unchanging angle. Look up Milankovitch cycle.
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Look up "Milankovitch cycles" in Wikipedia.

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