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true or false. if every person in the world jump at the same time the world would move.

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BlastedRemnants

True, in that the world is always moving, regardless of what we do. And also false, in that our jumping would not CAUSE the Earth to move.

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That's a bit like being in a crashing plane and trying to jump just before it hits the ground.

On the other hand, since you're gonna die anyway, maybe it's worth a try.
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BlastedRemnants
Nah, they did that on Mythbusters, lol. Not that they really "test" things as well as they ought to on that show though.
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Newton disagrees with y'all.
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Newton? I thought he only knew about apples.
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@BR: Good pic. Nobody's going to call you honey now. At least, none of the guys.
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BlastedRemnants
Ha! Thanks Dozy, lol. :)

What do you mean though, Noveltman? If something is falling at 60 some odd miles per hour, jumping is going to make very little difference at impact. Not to mention the chances of overhead debris catching up with you when you "land", lol. Or are you talking about the whole jumping to move the Earth thing? I really cannot imagine that people jumping would have any effect at all on the orbit or rotation of our planet.
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The force of any human jump would be unnoticeable at 60 mph, but if we could measure it precisely enough, it would cause a change.
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BlastedRemnants
Yeah, but not enough of a change to prevent the whole "Spaltter Effect" when you hit bottom, lol.
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Is or an answer? Just kidding i think its false.

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This is false because the world does not move it only rotates within its own axis. Scientific facts prove that turns counter-clockwise which is an orbital motion towards the east. Visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth's_rotation for more information on earth's rotation.

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BlastedRemnants
Actaully, the Earth does move as it orbits around the sun.
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The world doesn't move? Are you sure about that?
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false. any other arguments r invaild.

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False. :)

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I think false 'cause the earth is moving on an orbit so powerful that nothing (besides a huge space rock was to hit earth, which would end all life as we know it) could make it do in another way.

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False. Ignoring the enormous size of the earth, it's a circle. The force is being exerted on all sides. I've read that you could have an earthquake though, but no more than a 5.0. An atom bomb detonating will have a much larger effect. Hows about we blow a couple of them at once while we do it?

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Newton disagrees with you, unless we're only concerned with movement that's perceivable and measurable.
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The mass of all the people on the planet relative to the mass of the world is negligible. So no it would not move due to this occurrence.

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Jumping will have no effect on the earth's movement. The earth spins on its axis once a day at approximately 1000 mph. The earth orbits the sun once a year at a speed of 66,000 miles per hour. In addition, our solar system is travelling towards the star Vega at about 43,000 miles per hour. So you see, even if we are sitting and typing on our computers, we are travelling fast through space.

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I think its False

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It is false

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No the now 7 billion and counting would not even be enough to even jolt it, the earth is in a tight orbital lock and has been for years, it would take the force of a sun larger than our own or a black hole, if it were enough due to the fact the earth is round the effect would be too distributed, and Asia will have the most effect due to the population size

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Yes, according to Newton, every action has an equal and opposite reaction, so it would move, but it would be in relation to the difference in masses, so the distance the earth would move, would be something like less that the width of a proton, or whatever. Very small, impossible to measure, but factual, due to the principle of the issue. They've proven this stuff time and time again. We've been in space, you know.

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BlastedRemnants
Oh, I see what your comment was about now, lol. I disagree though, and I hope that you will too in a moment. Everything does have an equal and opposite reaction, that is true. But in this case, I don't think that the reaction would be the Earth moving, not even a fraction of a proton's width. I think it would be much more likely to compact the surface that we all jumped from, whether it be the floor, the dirt beneath it, or the plates below that. Earth is not a solid mass of material, like a bowling ball, it is a mashup of all sorts of different stuff, like a chicken nugget. So, the force that our jump exerted would be transfered from one material to the next, losing energy every step of the way and fading away entirely long before having any effect at all on our orbit or rotation. That's what I think anyway, but I'm a highschool dropout, I admit it lol.
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It's an interesting point. However, when we are at the apex of our jump, say a foot off the ground, there IS mutual gravitational attraction. The effect it has on us is quite clear: we come right back down. The effect on earth could only be described as theoretical, but it is there, I believe. Could be wrong.
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BlastedRemnants
I actually think that us leaving the ground IS the equal and opposite reaction to us pushing against it. We push, the Earth doesn't move, so we jump instead.
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But! Does the earth really not move? Our leg muscles create a force. WE move away from our mutual center, say maybe a foot. You claim the earth will move not at ALL? We went into space, you float, you push something, it moves away from you, AND you move away from it (away from the spot where you pushed it). It's all connected to the masses of the objects. I swear science backs this up.
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BlastedRemnants
Well sure, but there are times when you will try to move something that can not be moved. At times like this, the reaction is still equal and opposite, but it's in a different direction. I'm no science expert, so I can't really explain exactly what I mean, but the Earth is where it is in the Galaxy because of the Sun and everything else up there. Any force that we could possibly exert down here would be restricted to our immediate surroundings. As in, whatever is directly below each of us as we jump. I think that at the most, we might compact the ground a bit if we managed to cram everyone into a small enough area, but that would be it. Remeber that we're talking about moving the entire planet, and that the Earth's position in Space is determined by it's mass and gravity compared to everything else's mass and gravity. So all we would really be doing is moving some of our planetary mass around for a moment, nothing would change in the big picture. I wish I could explain my thoughts a bit better, maybe Waldorff will see this and tell us who's right, lol.
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Well, it's more of a thought experiment, but I really wasn't referring to our tiny feet pushing on the earth when we land, so much as our tiny mass moving off our planet for a tiny moment of time.
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seagirl1998

Well it would a bit, but e world is heavier than 7 billion people. Maybe in 20ish years. Btw thanks for following me.

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false.

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