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"all-eee, all-eee, -------------?or oly, oly? -----------------

When playing "hide & seek", or "kick the can", and you want anyone who hasn't been found to come out, game over, the person seeking the others, yells something to the effect of, "all-eee, all-eee, --- ----- ----- !" what is the last part of that statement?! My husband and I can't remember!

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The last part of the statement that is said when playing hide and seek or kick the can is olly-olly-ee, ally ally in free. It can also be said as "All-y all-y in come free. For more details on this, check out, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olly_olly_oxen_free.

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.. and all those years I played those games, I never knew what I was saying or why!! Thank you so much for going the extra mile and taking the time to answer me! I did go to your suggested page and that was helpful too! Thanks again and have a great weekend!
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Never heard of that..
That's cool!! :)

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Hi! Thanks for taking the time to even answer, even if you weren't sure of the answer. Just a quick note: clairedrom did know and the answer is: "All-y All-y in come free" or, "All ye, all ye, 'outs' in free'" (the All-y's are pronounced as I wrote them all-eee) and the other is: "Olly, Olly, oxen free", the "Olly one stems from Germany. Thanks again for your interest and Have a great weekend!
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I havn't heard of that before so I will do some research on that.

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Good Morning! Thank you so much for even taking an interest and rising to the occasion to do some research! That's very sweet of you! To save you the time, clairedrom sent me to that Wiki page!, I'll share with you what I found out. "All-y All-y in come free" or, "All ye all ye 'outs' in free'" (the All-y's are pronounced as I wrote them all-eee) and the other is: "Olly, Olly, oxen free" the Olly one stems from Germany. Thanks again, and have a great weekend!
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Never heard of that... I guess Claire is right?

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