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how do i make my dog listen to me when off the lead

when i take my dog to the park and let him off the lead he goes buck wild. everyday we go to the park and he acts as if hes never been before. we'll be playing fetch an someone will walk past hell go up to them ill tell him to come here an he wont listen to me cause hes so excited. people are scared of him cause hes so big even thought he does mean any harm.he listens very well in the house an On the leash. what can i do to make him listen off the lead??

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Dogs are situational learners this means that you will have to train him how to behave in public. You trained him how obey your commands in the house with a leash that's why he is 100 percent obedient. Now you have to move the training to the outdoor. Start with your back yard and proceed to the street. You will eventually reach the park and after a few days of learning it will learn.

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You can get a clicker, it gets dogs attention ( I saw it on its me or the dog ) also you can use it to train him, im going to get one for my dog.
Hope this helps

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thx
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Clickers work well because it's a unique sound. I whistle-trained my dog because it's a lot louder so I can call him over a great distance and he'll come to me.

Either way, use positive reinforcement. Anytime you click or blow the whistle, and he comes to you, give him a treat. Rip up small bits because you're going to be doing it a lot at first. I like to use puperoni because it's soft (easy to rip) and smelly, so it keeps my dog's nose interested, and his attention. Start by introducing what the clicker/whistle means. Work slowly at first, just by making the noise and immediately giving a treat. Soon he'll learn that anytime he hears this sound he gets a treat. Then build distance. Stand a few feet away and click/whistle and say "come." When he does, give him the treat. Practice this often. Practice on the leash, in your own yard and then eventually with distractions.

Another very important note... ONLY use the command "come" for something good. Never say "come" when you are asking the dog to do anything unpleasant like go inside, put on a leash, spanking, etc. (I don't recommend spanking ever... but just using it as an example). For these use another phrase like "let's go" or "inside" so that he learns the difference between an important situation where he has to come to you right away and just follow you in your general direction.

At the park, click/whistle throughout your time there so that it's not just at the end when it's time to leave. He'll learn to "check in" with you. Every so often he may even come to you on his own... when he does this, offer him a treat. Don't overdo it though - you still want him to run and play away from you.

Lastly, I'd add a hand signal to your "come" command. I like to point to the ground in front of me. It's also important that he comes directly to you, so if he meanders or hesitates, no treat (this is only as he gets more advanced).
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ps - I don't recommend a shock collar. It's unnecessary. A whistle is loud and grabs his attention, which is the point of the shock. Shocking a dog to get him to come doesn't work... it will only build fear. Positive reinforcement is the best method to keep your dog close to you.
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Nerdgurl456

You can get a shock collar. Many shock collars also have a clicker feature, and work several yards away from the dog. Or, you at home when he barks you can grab his snout, clamp it shut (firmly but gently) and say "Quiet!" Eventually this gives the dog the message that they can't bark. IF the dog jumps, first, bop it on the nose. If the dog jumps again, take is collar and put him down on the ground. If he bites do the quiet thing just say "No Sir!" or "No biting!" or "No ma'am!" Good luck with your dog! I know they're a handful.

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You know that your dog is smart and obedient at times. I agree with kuriafiddie above about ramping up the situation, building up to the park. If you have a neighbor with a dog, maybe you can get both of them in the same yard and work on obedience with more distraction than just in your back yard with the 2 of you but less than what's at the park. Add distractions in stages. Btw, I really disagree with the use of shock collars, as some have suggested. They teach by way of punishment; teaching with positive reinforcement is usually much more effective. You and your dog will be working together, instead of against each other, if you use lots of praise and a few treats when he responds correctly.

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