Q:

Who is the antagonist in "The Destructors" by Graham Greene?

A:

Quick Answer

Graham Greene's short story "The Destructors" does not have a traditional antagonist. The story is told from the point of view of a boy named Trevor, and the victim of his rampage is Mr. Thomas.

Know More

Full Answer

Greene's short story features a gang of young boys led by Trevor, who set out to destroy a historic house that survived the German bombing of London.

The house belongs to a man named Mr. Thomas, who is the closest thing the story has to an antagonist, although he merely serves as a victim to Trevor's rampage, rather than an opposing force. The protagonists are the boys who destroy the home of Mr. Thomas.

Learn more about Fiction
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is Shelter like in "Stone Cold"?

    A:

    In "Stone Cold," Shelter is the antagonist and is presented as an evil person in the book. He is a military veteran, and is angry at being discharged after years of service.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who is Teofilo in "The Man to Send Rain Clouds"?

    A:

    The character Teofilo in the short story "The Man to Send Rain Clouds" by Leslie Marmon Silke is the old man who is found dead under the big cottonwood tree. He is also the title character of the story and a Native American. It is his funeral that causes the cultural conflict between the Native Americans and the young Catholic priest.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the setting of "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson?

    A:

    The setting of Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery" takes place in an area named "the village." Though it is thought to be inspired by the small New England villages, the village in the story is never formally named.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the theme of the short story "Miss Brill?"

    A:

    The theme of Katherine Mansfield's short story, "Miss Brill," is the contrast of illusion and reality, and is based on the need of the story's eponymous namesake for constructing romanticized illusions as part of her personal denial of reality. Miss Brill, an Englishwoman and spinster in a foreign country who tutors children, compensates for her loneliness by projecting herself into the lives of the strangers she observes around her. She has a need for love and a connection to others, but her needs remain repressed and frustrated.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore