Q:

What are the character traits of Atticus Finch?

A:

Atticus Finch's character traits include being sympathetic, understanding and unwavering in his beliefs. He is one of the main characters in Harper Lee's classic novel "To Kill A Mockingbird."

Atticus has a calm demeanor, especially in his role as a single father when parenting his children. He has a tendency to treat his children as adults, with a quiet persistence to urge them to think for themselves. Atticus is one of the more prominent citizens in the town, but unlike others, he holds no racism or bigotry.

Atticus does believe in the justice system, and he holds that Tom, who is accused of a crime because of his skin color, is an innocent man. Atticus has an unwavering position regarding Tom's innocence. While Atticus is well portrayed as a quiet hero within the novel, this point of view is not necessarily shared by his children. They love and respect him, but his age is often a source of embarrassment for them. As the novel progresses, his children's attitude somewhat improves. In many notes regarding "To Kill A Mockingbird," one of Atticus' main character traits is his consistency throughout the story and his unwillingness to be swayed.

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