Q:

What was the classical allusion in Romeo and Juliet?

A:

Quick Answer

Two classical allusions are found in Act I, Scene 1 of "Romeo and Juliet," when Romeo talks about his love. He states that she will "...not be hit With Cupid’s arrow. She hath Dian’s wit." This references the Greek myth of Cupid, who caused people to fall in love by firing his weapons at them. Romeo also favorably compares his beloved's cleverness to Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt.

Know More

Full Answer

In addition, Scene I, Act 1 contains a classical allusion to Aurora, the Roman goddess of the dawn. Romeo's mother worries that her son avoids daytime, staying out all night and not coming home until first light: "...as the all-cheering sun/ Should in the farthest east begin to draw/ The shady curtains from Aurora’s bed,/ Away from light steals home my heavy son."

Another classical allusion occurs in Act II, Scene 2, when Juliet tells Romeo that she longs to hear his name spoken over and over, but she must hide their love from her family: "Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies,/ And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine,/ With repetition of 'My Romeo!'" This is a reference to Echo, a nymph from Greek mythology who was cursed to forever repeat the words of others. Juliet wishes for Echo to copy her, saying Romeo's name until they are unable to continue.

Learn more about Classics

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is an example of hyperbole in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is filled with examples of hyperbole, such as when Romeo says that "[t]he brightness of [Juliet's] cheek would shame those stars, / As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven / Would through the airy region stream so bright / That birds would sing and think it were not night" (Act 2). This statement is hyperbolic because Juliet is not literally shining like the sun, and her eyes do not actually cause the birds to think that it is daytime.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many people died in "Romeo and Juliet?"

    A:

    Six people died in the play "Romeo and Juliet" - Mercutio, Tybalt, Lady Montague, Paris, Romeo and Juliet. The tragic suicides of star-crossed lovers Romeo and Juliet are the most famous deaths in the play.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are examples of oxymorons in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    One example of oxymoron in "Romeo and Juliet" comes from Act I, scene i when Romeo says, "O brawling love! O loving hate!" William Shakespeare made plentiful use of oxymorons in his tragedy. An oxymoron is a statement or phrase employing seemingly contradictory terms. Brawling does not seem synonymous with love, nor does loving with hate.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is an example of situational irony in "Julius Caesar"?

    A:

    An example of situational irony in the play "Julius Caesar" occurs in Act 3, Scene 1 when Caesar proclaims that he is "constant like the North Star" shortly before he is killed by the Senators. Situational irony occurs when an outcome is considerably different from what was expected.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore