Q:

Why did Heck Tate insist that Bob Ewell fell on his own knife?

A:

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In the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird," Sheriff Heck Tate was trying to protect Boo Radley when he insisted that Bob Ewell fell on his own knife. Boo killed Bob Ewell, but the sheriff believed Bob's death was natural justice, and wanted to keep Boo out of the court proceedings.

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Heck Tate, Boo Radley and Bob Ewell are all characters in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird." Heck Tate is the sheriff of Maycomb County, where the story takes place. Boo Radley is a reclusive character who ultimately protects the children from Bob Ewell. Mr. Ewell is the main antagonist and, near the end of the book, attempts to murder Jem and Scout Finch.

In the beginning of the book, Bob Ewell's daughter was abused, and Tom Robinson, a local black man, was tried and convicted for the crime. Most people in the town, however, knew that Bob himself had abused her, as the man was a disgrace and not to be trusted. After Tom was put to death, Bob was seen gloating around town. He was ultimately humiliated at the trial and began to seek revenge. He attempted to murder Jem and Scout Finch, children of the attorney, with a knife. Boo Radley stepped in and murdered Bob. The sheriff, however, submitted a report that Mr. Ewell fell on his own knife so Boo would not have to stand trial.

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