Q:

Why did Thoreau write "Civil Disobedience"?

A:

Henry David Thoreau wrote "Civil Disobedience" to protest slavery in the United States and the Mexican-American war. Thoreau was displeased with the government, and his essay helped to influence the Civil Rights Movement.

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Full Answer

In the essay, Thoreau urged Americans to rebel if they were unhappy with the actions of the government. He instructed unhappy Americans to refuse to pay taxes since those taxes were in a sense, supporting the government's actions. Thoreau himself was imprisoned for refusing to pay taxes, but he believed that if he stayed true to his beliefs, he would always be free. He strongly believed that the government should continue progressing to reflect the citizens.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are some interesting facts about Henry David Thoreau?

    A:

    Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts. Thoreau had two older siblings and one younger sibling.

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  • Q:

    What is a summary of "Civil Disobedience"?

    A:

    "Civil Disobedience" is an essay written by Henry David Thoreau that argues government should not dictate how people live their lives, believing people have the right to follow their conscience. The essay was included in "A Yankee in Canada, with Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers," published in 1866.

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  • Q:

    Who are some famous people known for civil disobedience?

    A:

    Some famous people known for civil disobedience are Henry David Thoreau, Mohandas Gandhi and Vaclav Havel. Civil disobedience is the refusal to comply with unjust laws as a form of political protest.

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  • Q:

    What did Montesquieu write?

    A:

    Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu researched and wrote about a wide range of disciplines and issues including the law, social life and anthropology. He mainly wrote about and in support of constitutional theory and constitutional systems, principles of governance and separation of powers. His other key areas were slavery, preservation of civil liberties and the law and the reflection of social and geographical aspects in political and government institutions.

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