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What is the epiphany in the story "Araby"?

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At the end of "Araby," the narrator has an epiphany when he decides to give up on his love for Mangan's sister. "Araby" is a short story by James Joyce, published in 1914, which tells the story of a group of people living on North Richmond Street. The story is written in a first-person narrative style.

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The epiphany faced by the narrator is not positive, as he neither reaffirms his love to Mangan's sister nor realizes that the money he spent on gifts when trying to win her love were not worth it. Instead, he gives up entirely on love and his idealized concept of sexuality. At the end, the narrator is left alone.

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