Q:

What are examples of heroic couplets?

A:

Quick Answer

Examples of heroic couplets can be found in "Canterbury Tales" and "Legend of Good Women" by Geoffrey Chaucer and "Cooper's Hill" by John Denham. Heroic couplets are defined by rhyming lines written in a sequence, and they are commonly found in narrative and epic forms of traditional English poetry.

Know More

Full Answer

An example of a heroic couplet from the General Prologue of "Canterbury Tales" is, "Whan that aprill with his shoures soote / The droghte of march hath perced to the roote." Another example of a heroic couplet from "Cooper's Hill" is, "O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream / My great example, as it is my theme."

Learn more about Literature

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Who wrote "The Canterbury Tales"?

    A:

    The author of "The Canterbury Tales" is Geoffrey Chaucer. Chaucer's works are considered to be a cornerstone of English literature and are taught in universities across the globe. Born in London in 1343, he was famous for his use of satire and dry humor to bring attention to the faults of society in his time.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is "The Pardoner's Tale" about?

    A:

    "The Pardoner's Tale" from Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" tells a moral tale against the sins of gluttony, blaspheming, drinking and gambling in which three young men die because of their greed. The Pardoner's overriding theme is that greed is the root of all evil.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    From where did William Shakespeare get his ideas?

    A:

    William Shakespeare's biggest inspirations were the works of other phenomenal medieval writers, such as Publius Ovidius Naso, Lucius Annaeus Seneca, and Geoffrey Chaucer. Apart from classical authors, he was also greatly influenced by great English historians, such as Raphael Holinshed.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    "The Wife of Bath's Tale" disguises what as what?

    A:

    "The Wife of Bath's Tale," from Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales," is an exemplum, a story that disguises a polemic with serious political and religious undertones as a farcical portrait of a bawdy woman. The subtext of the story is that the Wife is deeply heretical for insisting on her rights in the face of official oppression from the religious and secular authorities of the day.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore