Q:

What are some examples of irony in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?"

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Quick Answer

There are several examples of irony in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," including the fact that Huck often knows better than the adults around him even though he did not grow up with a family for guidance. Irony can also be seen in the way that Sally Phelps and Miss Watson are not concerned about the cruelty of taking Jim away from his family, yet they are considered good, caring people. There is also the ironic observation that while Jim is supposed to be uncivilized and savage, he has a stronger and better moral code than the other so-called civilized characters.

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Full Answer

"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" was written by novelist Mark Twain in 1884. Twain was born two decades after the end of the Civil War, but he chose to set his book decades earlier when slavery was a more prominent part of life. The book takes a look at slavery and racism through the eyes of Huck. It is one of the book's major themes.

Huck is a poor and uneducated boy who teaches himself. Huck becomes mistrustful of the world and the people in society because they have branded him as an outcast and have not helped him avoid abuse. As his relationship grows with Jim, he questions the ideas of slavery and race.

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    What are the character traits of Huckleberry Finn?

    A:

    Huckleberry Finn is a playful, enterprising, mischievous and compassionate boy of about 13 or 14 years old. He is a free spirit who observes the world logically and practically, without judgement, and who constantly struggles with his conscience and society's rules. He was introduced in "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer."

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    What are the metaphors in "Huckleberry Finn?"

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    Metaphors in “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” include slavery, which was a metaphor for injustice and social bondage, and the Mississippi River, which represents freedom. In the book, the river represented a way to escape from social injustice on a path to rebirth.

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    How do I describe Huckleberry Finn?

    A:

    Some words to describe Huckleberry Finn are literal, pragmatic, conscientious and humorous. He is also described as non-judgmental, adaptable, cunning, logical, playful and inventive. His ultimate decision to reject the laws of his society by helping a slave, Jim, to escape, marks his emergence as a hero.

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    Why did Mark Twain write "Huckleberry Finn"?

    A:

    Mark Twain wrote "Huckleberry Finn" as a sequel to "Tom Sawyer." In his writing process, he ended up creating a satire of the supposedly civilized society in which he lived, which was actually infused with racism in spite of the abolition of slavery. This was his critique on a society that he had not censured at all in "Tom Sawyer."

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