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What are examples of similes in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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Quick Answer

One example of a simile in William Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet" is in Act 1, scene 4, when Romeo says that love "pricks like thorn." Another occurs in Act 2, scene 2, when Romeo says that lover's tongues are "like softest music to attending ears."

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Similes often use the word "like" to make comparisons. Another famous simile in Romeo and Juliet occurs just as Romeo sees Juliet in Act 1, scene 5: "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night / Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear." The "rich jewel" is Juliet, and the "night" is like the dark skin of a native of Ethiopia.

In addition to comparing using the word "like," similes compare with the word "as." The play includes some of these similes as well. For example, in Act 2, scene 2, Juliet expresses the power of her love to Romeo, saying, "My bounty is as boundless as the sea, / My love as deep." In the same scene, Romeo compares the joy that lovers take in each other's presence to the joy that students feel when they are leaving school: "Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from their books, / But love from love, toward school with heavy looks."

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    What is an example of hyperbole in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is filled with examples of hyperbole, such as when Romeo says that "[t]he brightness of [Juliet's] cheek would shame those stars, / As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven / Would through the airy region stream so bright / That birds would sing and think it were not night" (Act 2). This statement is hyperbolic because Juliet is not literally shining like the sun, and her eyes do not actually cause the birds to think that it is daytime.

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  • Q:

    What are some examples of blank verse in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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    An example of blank verse in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is: "And, when he shall die, / Take him and cut him out in little stars, / And he will make the face of heaven so fine / That all the world will be in love with night / And pay no worship to the garish sun." Another example of blank verse is: "How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath / To say to me that thou are out of breath? / The excuse that thou dost make in this delay / Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse."

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  • Q:

    Where is a simile used in Act 4 of "Romeo and Juliet"?

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    A simile is used in Act 4, Scene 3, Line 39 of "Romeo and Juliet," when Juliet is describing her fear of waking up in the burial vault and compares it to "the horrible conceit of death and night." Juliet goes on to use another simile on line 49, fearing the "shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth."

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  • Q:

    Where does apostrophe occur in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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    The most well-known apostrophe in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" occurs in Act 2 Scene 2, in which Juliet asks the absent Romeo, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" Because an apostrophe can be defined as any time a character speaks to a personified idea or anyone who is not present, there are several apostrophes in the play.

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