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What are examples of strophic form?

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Strophic form is a song format in which all verses are sung to the same melody and each verse repeats a refrain line. The format dates back to the earliest popular poems set to music and lends itself to storytelling and sing-alongs.

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Some traditional children's songs in the strophic form are “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” and “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” Other popular songs from the 20th century include “Blowin’ In The Wind” by Bob Dylan, “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” by Glen Campbell, “I Walk The Line” by Johnny Cash and “Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Simon and Garfunkel.

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    What are some examples of poetic justice?

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