Folklore

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The line "Wednesday's child is full of woe" is a part of a nursery rhyme known as "Monday's Child," sometimes attributed to Mother Goose; it predicts that children born on Wednesday are sad.

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  • How long do vampires live?

    Q:How long do vampires live?

    A:

    Vampires are purported to live forever, barring any type of attempt to kill them. Legend has it that a vampire can only be killed if it's stabbed through the heart with a stake, shot through the heart with a silver bullet, burned, beheaded or exposed to sunlight, although vampires are also intolerant of garlic, holy water and crucifixes.

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  • What is the blue corn moon in the movie "Pocahontas?"

    Q:What is the blue corn moon in the movie "Pocahontas?"

    A:

    The blue corn moon referred to in the song "Colors of the Wind" from "Pocahontas" is a fictitious concept and does not refer to any particular moon phase. The concepts of blue moon and full corn moon do exist and refer to different types of full moons occurring at various times of the year.

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  • What is the moral of "Rip Van Winkle"?

    Q:What is the moral of "Rip Van Winkle"?

    A:

    The moral of "Rip Van Winkle" is that life passes by with or without a person and that change is inevitable. The story also shows that a person will pay dearly when they try to avoid change; in many ways, Irving is asking his readers to be active participants in their own lives and enjoy each moment.

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  • How did Odysseus show his bravery?

    Q:How did Odysseus show his bravery?

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    Odysseus showed his bravery by fighting valiantly in the war with Troy, facing great dangers on his decade-long voyage home and ridding his home of his wife's parasitical suitors upon his return. During his lengthy ordeal after incurring Poseidon's wrath, he had many opportunities to demonstrate his resourcefulness, cunning and courage.

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  • Has anyone ever been raised by wolves?

    Q:Has anyone ever been raised by wolves?

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    There are many accounts of people being raised by wolves, as well as other animals. Cases exist of people being raised by monkeys, wild dogs and even wild cats. Some people have been protected by animals as if they were a part of their pack for days, weeks, even years.

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  • What color was Santa's suit originally?

    Q:What color was Santa's suit originally?

    A:

    Researchers at the BBC insist that the red and white of Santa's suit has been around for quite some time. Some people have stated that Santa's original suit was a more subdued hue similar to tan.

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  • Why is an owl a bad omen?

    Q:Why is an owl a bad omen?

    A:

    The role of an owl as a bad omen stretches back to ancient mythology in a number of cultures. Many cultures believe that owls signal an underworld, represent death or human spirits after death. Owls are not, however, universal omens.

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  • Why do we say "silly goose"?

    Q:Why do we say "silly goose"?

    A:

    The expression “silly goose” refers to a person who acts in a childish, foolish but somewhat comical way. This term originates from several sources. The entry in the Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states, “A foolish or ignorant person is called a goose because of the alleged stupidity of this bird." The Samuel Johnson dictionary describes geese as, “Large waterfowl proverbially noted, I know not why, for foolishness."

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  • What are traditional tales?

    Q:What are traditional tales?

    A:

    Traditional tales are stories that are passed down orally as part of the shared tradition of a culture. Traditional tales include myths, folk tales and legends. These tales often include fantasy elements and metaphorical lessons.

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  • What is the moral of Rapunzel?

    Q:What is the moral of Rapunzel?

    A:

    Various interpretation of the moral of "Rapunzel" concern the inevitability of the life cycle and procreation. Other interpretations of the story focus on the struggle of the young against the old, according to SurLaLune Fairy Tales.

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  • What is the theme of "Cinderella?"

    Q:What is the theme of "Cinderella?"

    A:

    The story of "Cinderella" has a number of different themes that include nature, morality and grace. Versions of the story date back to ancient Greece but the themes have remained the same in time.

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  • How many Knights of the Round Table were there?

    Q:How many Knights of the Round Table were there?

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    Depending on the tradition one reads, besides Arthur there were between 12 knights and over 1,600. The most commonly accepted number, however, is the 25 knights shown on the Winchester Round Table.

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  • What is an example of a fable?

    Q:What is an example of a fable?

    A:

    An example of a fable would be "The Ant and the Grasshopper," by the Greek fabulist Aesop. A fable is a short fictional story, often containing elements such as anthropomorphic animals, written for the benefit of a concluding maxim or moral.

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  • What does an elf look like?

    Q:What does an elf look like?

    A:

    Originally, elves were creatures of ancient Norse myth, and they looked like slender, small versions of fair-skinned blond Scandinavian people. As tales of elves spread throughout cultures and then literature, their appearances became increasingly varied.

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  • What is the best way to wish someone good luck?

    Q:What is the best way to wish someone good luck?

    A:

    Wishing someone good luck on their future endeavors is a friendly and polite gesture that can be done in a variety of ways, preferably by sending a handwritten note. The note may be accompanied by wishing the recipient well either in person or on the phone, depending on the relationship to him or her.

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  • What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?

    Q:What is the name of the giant in "Jack and the Beanstalk"?

    A:

    In the original text of "Jack and the Beanstalk," the name of the giant is not given. However, most plays that are based on the story have the giant named Blunderbore. The giant goes by similar names in other versions of the story, including Blunderboar, Thunderbore, Blunderbus and Blunderbuss.

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  • What is the moral of "The Ugly Duckling"?

    Q:What is the moral of "The Ugly Duckling"?

    A:

    The moral of "The Ugly Duckling" is that people should never give up on following their passions and finding their place in society. "The Ugly Duckling," a fairy tale written by Hans Christian Andersen that was published in 1943, focuses on the story of a young "duckling" who doesn't appear to fit in with or look like the rest of the group.

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  • Do werewolves really exist?

    Q:Do werewolves really exist?

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    There is no credible scientific information to date that supports the existence of werewolves. Many scholars who study the history of werewolves disagree among themselves about what exactly a werewolf is, making it harder still to prove or disprove their existence.

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  • What is the moral lesson of the story about the rabbit and turtle race?

    Q:What is the moral lesson of the story about the rabbit and turtle race?

    A:

    The moral of the story "The Tortoise and the Hare" is that the weakest opponent should never be underestimated. In the story, the rabbit is beat by the turtle in a race because he took a nap and underestimated the turtle's ability to pass him up.

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  • How did superstitions start?

    Q:How did superstitions start?

    A:

    Sarah Albert at WebMD says that superstitions start when a ritual or belief is given magical significance. For instance, if a woman believes that a black cat crossing her path means she has to go back home and start over or suffer bad luck, she follows a superstition. Superstitions spread when they "work," and other people repeat them.

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