Folklore

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Symbols for the Greek goddess Demeter include the cornucopia, wheat ears and a winged serpent. Other symbols that are associated with Demeter are symbols of the harvest, domesticated animals, some wild animals and plants.

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  • Why do we say "silly goose"?

    Q: Why do we say "silly goose"?

    A:

    The expression “silly goose” refers to a person who acts in a childish, foolish but somewhat comical way. This term originates from several sources. The entry in the Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states, “A foolish or ignorant person is called a goose because of the alleged stupidity of this bird." The Samuel Johnson dictionary describes geese as, “Large waterfowl proverbially noted, I know not why, for foolishness."

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  • What does "Wednesday's child is full of woe" mean?

    Q: What does "Wednesday's child is full of woe" mean?

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    The line "Wednesday's child is full of woe" is a part of a nursery rhyme known as "Monday's Child," sometimes attributed to Mother Goose; it predicts that children born on Wednesday are sad.

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  • What is the moral of "Little Red Riding Hood"?

    Q: What is the moral of "Little Red Riding Hood"?

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    The moral to the story of "Little Red Riding Hood" is that children must obey their parents and that they must never talk to strangers. Even a very friendly stranger is capable of having bad intentions.

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  • What color was Santa's suit originally?

    Q: What color was Santa's suit originally?

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    Researchers at the BBC insist that the red and white of Santa's suit has been around for quite some time. Some people have stated that Santa's original suit was a more subdued hue similar to tan.

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  • Who wrote the book "Cinderella"?

    Q: Who wrote the book "Cinderella"?

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    Cinderella was written and published under the name "The Little Glass Slipper" in 1697 by Frenchman Charles Perrault. In 1812, the Brothers Grimm published the story in their famous book of fairy tales.

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  • What is the moral lesson of the story about the rabbit and turtle race?

    Q: What is the moral lesson of the story about the rabbit and turtle race?

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    The moral of the story "The Tortoise and the Hare" is that the weakest opponent should never be underestimated. In the story, the rabbit is beat by the turtle in a race because he took a nap and underestimated the turtle's ability to pass him up.

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  • What is the theme of "Cinderella?"

    Q: What is the theme of "Cinderella?"

    A:

    The story of "Cinderella" has a number of different themes that include nature, morality and grace. Versions of the story date back to ancient Greece but the themes have remained the same in time.

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  • What are traditional tales?

    Q: What are traditional tales?

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    Traditional tales are stories that are passed down orally as part of the shared tradition of a culture. Traditional tales include myths, folk tales and legends. These tales often include fantasy elements and metaphorical lessons.

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  • What did Zeus do?

    Q: What did Zeus do?

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    Zeus did many things, but his most notable act was overthrowing his father Cronus and the rest of the Titans. After Zeus was born, his father wanted to eat him, but his mother protected him by hiding him in a cave. Once Zeus reached adulthood, he tricked his father into drinking a potion that made him regurgitate the rest of Zeus's siblings, and together, they overthrew Cronus.

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  • What is the story of "Swan Lake" about?

    Q: What is the story of "Swan Lake" about?

    A:

    The tragic love story of "Swan Lake" is about a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse. During the day she must swim as a swan in a lake of tears. At night she may be human again, but her spell can only be broken by a virgin prince who swears his eternal fidelity to her.

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  • What is the source of conflict in the short story "Rip Van Winkle"?

    Q: What is the source of conflict in the short story "Rip Van Winkle"?

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    The central conflict of "Rip Van Winkle" involves competing visions of American society following the Revolution. In the story, Washington Irving reveals an America falling short of its romanticized vision. He presents this symbolically through the journey of his title character, Rip.

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  • Where does the story of Cinderella take place?

    Q: Where does the story of Cinderella take place?

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    The geographical location of the kingdom in which Cinderella lives is not established in any of the known versions of the fairy tale. Since there are over 345 variants of the story from different times and cultures, it is difficult to infer where the original kingdom may have been located.

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  • What is the moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife"?

    Q: What is the moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife"?

    A:

    The moral of "The Fisherman and His Wife" is that a person must be thankful for what he has and not always want more, lest it become impossible for him ever to be satisfied. Those who do not appreciate the small things likely do not have the capacity to appreciate anything and are destined to live a life deprived of joy.

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  • How are fairies and pixies different?

    Q: How are fairies and pixies different?

    A:

    Pixies and fairies are both types of mythical creatures in human folklore and literature, but fairies derive from locations around the world, while pixies are considered beings native to Northern Europe, particularly England and the Scandinavian countries. Pixies and fairies appear in many books, works of art and even television shows and movies. Pixies and fairies are typically shown as minuscule creatures, but have different physical characteristics that set them apart.

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  • What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?

    Q: What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?

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    According to MSN Entertainment, the poetic character Frosty the Snowman was brought to life by a magic silk hat. The hat belonged to a magician named Professor Hinkle, who was hired to perform magic tricks for bored students.

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  • Why is an owl a bad omen?

    Q: Why is an owl a bad omen?

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    The role of an owl as a bad omen stretches back to ancient mythology in a number of cultures. Many cultures believe that owls signal an underworld, represent death or human spirits after death. Owls are not, however, universal omens.

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  • Can vampires have babies?

    Q: Can vampires have babies?

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    According to folklore, a male vampire can father children with a living woman. Sometimes known as dhampirs, such children exhibit unusual tastes for blood, and some have advanced hearing, smell and taste.

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  • What are the names of Snow White's seven dwarfs?

    Q: What are the names of Snow White's seven dwarfs?

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    The seven dwarfs in the classic Disney film "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" are Bashful, Doc, Dopey, Happy, Sleepy, Sneezy and Grumpy. The other main characters in the film include Snow White who is the kind and gentle princess who lives with the seven dwarfs, as well as the Evil Queen, the Prince, the Huntsman and the Magic Mirror.

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  • What should a vampire look like?

    Q: What should a vampire look like?

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    While there is some variation depending on tradition, vampires usually are described as looking like ordinary people but with very pale skin that becomes flushed with the consumption of blood. Sometimes the lips and mouth of a vampire are described as red or bloodstained. This appearance is explained by LiveScience as a normal effect of decomposition.

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  • Who wrote the first Robin Hood story?

    Q: Who wrote the first Robin Hood story?

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    Around 1377, the poem "Piers Plowman," by William Langland, made a passing reference to a character thought to be Robin Hood. A tale known as "Robin Hood and the Monk" was written about 1450, but the author is unknown.

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