Plays

A:

Romeo and Juliet are called "star-crossed lovers" because their relationship is destined to end in tragedy. No matter what actions Romeo and Juliet take to overcome the divide between their warring families, they are fated to fail and suffer unpleasant consequences. This popular concept first appeared in William Shakespeare's play "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet," in which the lovers die after a series of ironic miscommunications.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What is the literary term for a play-within-a-play?

    Q: What is the literary term for a play-within-a-play?

    A:

    A play-within-a-play is a literary device in which an additional play is performed during the performance of the main play. Experts agree that the device is generally used to highlight important themes or ideas of the main play.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a comedy?

    Q: What is a comedy?

    A:

    A comedy is a performance with a happy ending where good wins out over all the problems in the story. It is meant to make its audience laugh. A comedy comes in the form of movies, plays or television shows and is intended mostly for entertainment, though it sometimes holds certain messages the writer intends to convey.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why do many actors believe the play "Macbeth" is cursed?

    Q: Why do many actors believe the play "Macbeth" is cursed?

    A:

    The origins of the "curse of Macbeth" are shrouded in mystery, but the most commonly cited reason for the curse is the belief that Shakespeare used authentic witches' curses in the text, thereby investing it with bad luck. Believers point to a long and semi-apocryphal list of accidents as evidence.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some examples of dramatic irony in "Antigone"?

    Q: What are some examples of dramatic irony in "Antigone"?

    A:

    Sophocles' tragedy "Antigone" contains dramatic irony with the decision of Creon to bury one of Antigone's brothers with honor but not the other and with Antigone's determination and strength when contrasted with the characters' view of women as weak. In addition, Creon's dialogue often is filled with verbal irony stemming from his lack of awareness of the truth, which contrasts with the reader's knowledge.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some of the similes in "Macbeth"?

    Q: What are some of the similes in "Macbeth"?

    A:

    In "Macbeth," there are a number of similes including the similes found in: Act I, Scene II 3-5; Act I, Scene II 7-9; Act I Scene III 97; and Act V Scene Viii 43. The first simile is "This is the sergeant / Who like a good and hardy solider fought / 'Gainst my captivity.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is symbolism in drama?

    Q: What is symbolism in drama?

    A:

    Symbolism is a device in which an object, person or situation is given another meaning beyond its literal one--usually something more abstract or non-rational than the symbol itself. There are many kinds of symbols. Normally, dramatists weave clues into the work to indicate that certain elements are intended to be taken as symbolic.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Q: What is Oedipus' tragic flaw?

    A:

    Oedipus' tragic flaw generally is considered to be pride. A great deal of debate over the nature of Oedipus' tragic flaw exists among scholars throughout history.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is naturalism in drama?

    Q: What is naturalism in drama?

    A:

    Naturalism in drama refers to the belief that a play should try to represent reality as closely as possible. In naturalistic theater, stage time reflects real time, costumes and settings portray as many details of the time as possible, the play takes place in a single location over the course of a day, and characters are normally from working or lower classes.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why does Polonius think Hamlet is mad?

    Q: Why does Polonius think Hamlet is mad?

    A:

    According to Polonius, several contributing factors appear to have pushed Hamlet over the edge, including his father's recent death, his mother's swift remarriage to the possible culprit and his love for Polonius' daughter Ophelia. At first, he attributes the majority of Hamlet's symptoms of insanity to scorned love, but later he suspects that his answer may be too simple.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why is "Romeo and Juliet" a tragedy?

    Q: Why is "Romeo and Juliet" a tragedy?

    A:

    William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is generally regarded as a tragedy because it features dramatic and devastating events when the two main protagonists die at the end. It doesn't, however, fit the conventional mode of Greek tragedies.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How was Arthur Miller affected by McCarthyism?

    Q: How was Arthur Miller affected by McCarthyism?

    A:

    Arthur Miller was affected by McCarthyism in that he was subpoenaed to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee, or HUAC, as were many of those in the entertainment industry of the era. His play "The Crucible," though ostensibly about the Salem witch trials, was a veiled condemnation of McCarthy's hunt for communists.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are some props for a Nativity play?

    Q: What are some props for a Nativity play?

    A:

    The basic props for a church or school Nativity play include a stable, a manger, bales of hay, a Star of Bethlehem, gifts from the Wise Men and staffs for the shepherds. Animal and Baby Jesus props may be necessary if actors are not filling these roles.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the setting of "Phantom of the Opera"?

    Q: What is the setting of "Phantom of the Opera"?

    A:

    The setting of Gaston Leroux's novel "The Phantom of the Opera" is the Paris Opera House. The building itself, known as the Palais Garnier, was built between 1861 and 1875.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What do theater masks represent?

    Q: What do theater masks represent?

    A:

    The traditional theater comedy and drama masks, which originated in ancient Greek theater, represent the range of emotions displayed on stage. Greek actors traditionally made masks of perishable organic materials to wear for each performance and afterward sacrificed them to the god Dionysus.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is an example of hyperbole in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    Q: What is an example of hyperbole in "Romeo and Juliet"?

    A:

    William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is filled with examples of hyperbole, such as when Romeo says that "[t]he brightness of [Juliet's] cheek would shame those stars, / As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven / Would through the airy region stream so bright / That birds would sing and think it were not night" (Act 2). This statement is hyperbolic because Juliet is not literally shining like the sun, and her eyes do not actually cause the birds to think that it is daytime.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the role of a playgroup leader?

    Q: What is the role of a playgroup leader?

    A:

    A playgroup leader generally plans and runs playgroup sessions for three- to five-year-old children. The playgroup leader is responsible for making sure the planned activities are safe for children and ensuring those activities meet young children's physical, emotional and social needs.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why did Arthur Miller write "The Crucible"?

    Q: Why did Arthur Miller write "The Crucible"?

    A:

    Arthur Miller wrote "The Crucible" as a commentary or parable on the United States during the McCarthy Era of the 1950s. It is written as historical fiction, however, through the play, Miller illuminated how the social injustice of the Puritan's witchcraft trials was no different than what was unfolding around him during the McCarthy Era.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are Romeo's personality traits?

    Q: What are Romeo's personality traits?

    A:

    Romeo exhibits many typical personality traits of the Shakespearean lover but with an added fiery impulsiveness. As the story's hero, he displays gallantry, wit, courage and passion throughout the play. His passion, however, ultimately acts as a tragic flaw that causes fatal errors and leads him toward his demise.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What makes a good play?

    Q: What makes a good play?

    A:

    Some of the main components that determine whether a play is entertaining or successful are the story, script writing, performances of actors, stage management, set design and props, costumes, lighting design and sound.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Who was hanged at the end of "The Crucible"?

    Q: Who was hanged at the end of "The Crucible"?

    A:

    At the end of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," protagonist John Proctor was hanged as a witch. Also hanged with him were Rebecca Nurse, Martha Corey and five others. While all three were hanged in real life as witches, their executions occurred on different days.

    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: