Q:

Why was "An Inspector Calls" written?

A:

English playwright, novelist and broadcaster J.B. Priestley wrote "An Inspector Calls" in one week in 1944 to express his concerns and beliefs about society, class warfare, morality and personal responsibility. The play is described as one of the most famous promotions of socialism in British theater, according to GradeSaver.

"An Inspector Calls" focused on middle-class attitudes toward women and lower-class citizens, as well as public versus private behavior, according to the J.B. Priestley Society. It attempted to expose prejudices and underscore the importance of learning from the past and from mistakes. Critic Northrop Frye, as cited by GradeSaver, noted that the play, originally intended for a British audience, showed contrasting views between moral and religious beliefs about guilt.


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