Q:

How many people died in "Romeo and Juliet?"

A:

Quick Answer

Six people died in the play "Romeo and Juliet" - Mercutio, Tybalt, Lady Montague, Paris, Romeo and Juliet. The tragic suicides of star-crossed lovers Romeo and Juliet are the most famous deaths in the play.

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How many people died in "Romeo and Juliet?"
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Full Answer

William Shakespeare's famous tragedy "Romeo and Juliet" is a tale about the power of young love and the tragic consequences of a long-standing family feud. Mercutio, Tybalt and Paris died in fights for family honor, while Romeo and Juliet took their own lives because they could not live without each other. The themes of death, violence and love (all as a result of passion) run deep throughout the play.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the climax in Romeo and Juliet?

    A:

    The climax in the play "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare occurs with the deaths of both Romeo and Juliet inside of the Capulet tomb. The climax happens in Act 5, Scene 3, and it is in the same scene that the prince and the parents find the bodies.

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  • Q:

    What are some examples of juxtaposition in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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    Several examples of juxtaposition in "Romeo and Juliet" have to do with light contrasted with dark, as in Romeo's description of Juliet in Act I, Scene 5: "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night/ Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear." He goes on to say of her, "So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows/ As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows."

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  • Q:

    Why did William Shakespeare write "Romeo and Juliet?"

    A:

    William Shakespeare was inspired to write "Romeo and Juliet" by a poem titled "Romeus and Juliet" by Arthur Brooks. In fact, Shakespeare's play shares many of the details of Brooks' poem. The story, however, was a commonly told one throughout Europe and was not unique to Brooks either.

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  • Q:

    What was the classical allusion in Romeo and Juliet?

    A:

    Two classical allusions are found in Act I, Scene 1 of "Romeo and Juliet," when Romeo talks about his love. He states that she will "...not be hit With Cupid’s arrow. She hath Dian’s wit." This references the Greek myth of Cupid, who caused people to fall in love by firing his weapons at them. Romeo also favorably compares his beloved's cleverness to Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt.

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