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What are some of the metaphors in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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William Shakespeare uses a metaphor in "Romeo and Juliet" when Lady Capulet compares Paris to a book. Two other examples occur when Romeo compares Juliet to the sun and when Paris compares Juliet to a flower and her tomb to a bridal bed.

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In Act I, Scene 3, Lady Capulet describes Paris as a book in an extended metaphor that includes the words, "This precious book of love, this unbound lover." In Act II, Scene 2, Romeo says of Juliet, when he spots her on the balcony, "What light through yonder window breaks? / It is the east, and Juliet is the sun." In Act V, Scene 3, Paris goes to the tomb to mourn Juliet and says, "Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew."

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    What are some examples of juxtaposition in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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    Several examples of juxtaposition in "Romeo and Juliet" have to do with light contrasted with dark, as in Romeo's description of Juliet in Act I, Scene 5: "It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night/ Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear." He goes on to say of her, "So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows/ As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows."

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    What is an example of foreshadowing in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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    Foreshadowing In "Romeo and Juliet" is seen in Act III, scene 5 with Juliet's words, "Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low, / As one dead in the bottom of a tomb." She indeed soon sees Romeo dead.

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    Where is personification in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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