Q:

What is the moral of the fairy tale, "The Princess and the Pea?"

A:

There are several morals that can be derived from "The Princess and the Pea." However, the most popular one is that people should not judge others based on their appearances.

One version of the tale begins with a young girl who shows up at the king’s house at night claiming to be a princess. Due to the girl’s poor and dishevelled appearance, the royal family has a hard time believing her story. The queen decides to test the girl and discover if she is telling the truth by placing a small pea under her bed, which is made up of 20 mattresses and 20 feather beds. The next morning, the girl complains of bruises and says she was unable to sleep because of something hard pressing down on her back. The queen then reveals the truth about the pea, and everyone rejoices as they realize that she was telling the truth all along because only a princess could have such delicate and sensitive skin. The prince, who was looking for a true princess, joyfully marries her, and they live happily ever after. Some of the other morals of this fairy tale are that first impressions are not always correct and that the smallest of things can make a difference.


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