What is the moral of the story "The Ant and the Grasshopper"?
Credit: Mika Hiltunen CC-BY-2.0
Q:

What is the moral of the story "The Ant and the Grasshopper"?

A:

Quick Answer

The moral of the story "The Ant and the Grasshopper" is that it is important to be prepared and work hard in case hard times occur. The story was written by Aesop.

  Know More

Full Answer

The story of "The Ant and the Grasshopper" is about an ant that that was busy moving ears of corn around while the grasshopper was lazing around. The grasshopper wanted the ant to stop and talk to him, but the ant was too busy preparing for winter. The grasshopper insisted that they had enough food for winter, but when the cold weather came, he realized that the ant was right and he should have been prepared.

The story was one of several fables that were written by a storyteller and slave known as Aesop. He lived on the island of Samos and he eventually became a free man. The fables all contained a moral that was a lesson that children could learn from the fable. Aesop wrote stories often with animal characters as he knew that these would encourage the children to read and to learn. One of the most famous fables that Aesop wrote was "The Tortoise and the Hare" that had a moral of "slow and steady wins the race."

Learn more about Folklore

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the story of the lion and the mouse?

    A:

    The story of the lion and the mouse is an Aesop's fable that uses these two dynamically different animals to depict how mercy brings its own reward. It also shows that no being is too small to help a greater being. Furthermore, the story of the lion and the mouse conveys how when kindness is showed to others, it is often returned.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the moral of "Little Red Riding Hood"?

    A:

    The moral to the story of "Little Red Riding Hood" is that children must obey their parents and that they must never talk to strangers. Even a very friendly stranger is capable of having bad intentions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What makes a story a legend?

    A:

    A story is usually classified as a legend if it has some basis in historical fact. Legends are often passed down through successive generations and tend to have significant cultural meaning. They are often contrasted with myths and folktales.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How are Odysseus and Telemachus alike?

    A:

    Odysseus and his son Telemachus are the only two characters in "Odyssey" to significantly develop over the course of the story. While Telemachus is not as strong a leader as his father, both characters are courageous and intelligent. In any case, it is implied by the end of the story that Telemachus, who is introduced in the story as being 21 years old and therefore about to mature into manhood, is on course to follow in the footsteps of Odysseus and become a skilled leader.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore