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What is a personification poem?

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Quick Answer

A personification poem is a poem that bestows human-like qualities and emotions on either inhuman or inanimate objects, often in order to create symbolism and allegory. Many poets have used personification in their work, one such example being "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath.

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Personification is not limited to poetry alone, and often appears in prose writing as well. Book 3 of "Paradise Lost"' by John Milton contains one such example of personification: "Earth felt the wound; and Nature from her seat, Sighing, through all her works, gave signs of woe."

Personification can be applied to almost anything that is not human. This could be an animal, object or even an abstraction of some kind. There are many examples of personification being used as allegory. The virtue of justice, for example, is given the form of a knight in Edmund Spenser's "The Faerie Queene."

In addition to allegory and symbolism, personification in poetry in particular is often used to help enhance mood and tone, or to create enhanced emphasis on certain meditations or images in the piece.

Personification is often used in everyday language, whenever anything non-human is attributed with human qualities. "The car will not start, it is not feeling well," is an example of personification.

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