Q:

Where is personification in "Romeo and Juliet"?

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Quick Answer

Readers find personification in lines 18 through 20 of "Romeo and Juliet," beginning with Juliet’s short speech while waiting for Romeo, "for thou wilt lie upon the wings of the night, whiter than new snow on a raven’s back; come, gentle night, come, loving black browed night." Personification refers to the assignment of human qualities and characteristics to nonhuman and inanimate objects.

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Full Answer

In lines 18 through 20 of "Romeo and Juliet," personification describes the wings of the night and black brows of the night as well. The night, as an inanimate object, does not actually have wings or brows, but ascribing it those human qualities creates a mysterious and majestic mood.

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    A:

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