Q:

What poem has the line "may the wind always be at your back"?

A:

Quick Answer

The words "may the wind always be at your back" are part of a traditional Irish Gaelic blessing that is also considered a world prayer. The words make up the second line of the five-line poem or prayer.

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Full Answer

The traditional blessing has been made into a song and is typically listed without a title. The blessing's first line "May the road rise up to meet you" often serves as the substitute title. This blessing is derived from ancient Celtic literature and is similar to another Celtic prayer known as St. Patrick's Breastplate. Celtic prayers are known for their use of nature to describe the awesome power of God as well as using daily life as a witness to how God blesses his people.

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