Q:

Who said, "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown"?

A:

Quick Answer

King Henry IV, a character in William Shakespeare's play "Henry IV, Part 2," says "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown." The speech ending with this famous sentence takes place in the first scene of Act 3, as evident in the published version on The Tech website by MIT.

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Full Answer

In that speech, the King laments that poor people are able to sleep, even in the grimiest, most tumultuous conditions, while powerful men like himself, even in "the calmest and most stillest night, / With all appliances and means to boot" cannot find rest. He is worried that his kingdom is terribly sick because of the rebellion in Northumberland. By the end of the play, the rebellion is defeated and the king has died. The crown goes to his son, Prince Hal, who reigns afterward as Henry V.

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