Q:

What does the term "master speed" mean in the poem "The Master Speed" by Robert Frost?

A:

The term "master speed" in the Robert Frost poem of the same name refers to the enduring, timeless quality of love. The poet describes the transcendent quality of the bond between two people in love who are able to withstand the passing of time through memories.

Frost wrote the poem as a tribute to his daughter, Irma, and her fiancée, John Cone, on their wedding day in 1926. He first uses natural forms of speed, such as the movement of wind and water, to serve as a contrast to the speed afforded to two individuals who unite in love. This "master speed" is figurative, rather than literal, considering it cannot be measured or quantified. However, the ability for couples to form lasting memories that deepen the human bond transcends the physical aspect of life.

The final line of the poem, "Together wing to wing and oar to oar," is a metaphor for the unbreakable connection formed by two people who choose to join their lives together, a result of "the master speed." Interestingly, this line also appears on the gravestone Frost shares with his wife, Elinor, indicating the poem is autobiographical as well as a tribute to the eternal nature of love.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What is the poem "Birches" by Robert Frost about?

    A:

    The poem "Birches" by Robert Frost is about birch trees in a forest and what causes the limbs to arch and bend. The author initially imagines that the arches are caused by a young boy swinging on the branches.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What was Robert Frost's writing style?

    A:

    Robert Frost's writing style can best be described as a mix of 19th century tradition combined with 20th century contemporary technique. Frost was a modern poet who liked to use conventional form metrics combined with New England vernacular. His writing style changed gradually over time, becoming more abstract in his later years. Many experts believe this was largely due to his religious and political beliefs.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is Robert Frost's "Choose Something Like a Star" about?

    A:

    Robert Frost's "Choose Something Like a Star" is a plea for confirmation that man is not alone in the universe. The surprising mix of religion and science in the poem is a statement about humanity's desperation for that discovery.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is meaning of Robert Frost's "Fire and Ice"?

    A:

    Robert Frost's "Fire and Ice" discusses the question of whether the end of the world will come in ice or fire, and while that question is part of the meaning, so is the question as to whether cold or heat is the more painful, not just in terms of destruction but also emotion and pain. It is possible to explore the difference between the two on a number of levels based on the text of his poem.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore