Q:

What type of personality does Mercutio have?

A:

Quick Answer

Mercutio, a character in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," shows a playful and carefree personality much of the time, but can also be impatient. He has a zest for life and does not want to be tied down by romantic love or social proprieties.

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Full Answer

A relative to the Prince in the play, Mercutio is neither a Capulet nor a Montague and ends up cursing both families for their part in his death. He was invited to the Capulet ball in Act I, but prefers to sneak in with Benvolio and Romeo, thus showing his fun-loving nature. A foil to Romeo's character, Mercutio teases him when Romeo talks of a dream he had and cannot understand his friend's pining over Rosaline or his infatuation with Juliet. He loves word play, delivering puns with his dying breaths, even though obviously angry with both Tybalt and Romeo.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why does Mercutio say "A plague o' both your houses"?

    A:

    In Shakespeare's tragedy, "Romeo and Juliet," Mercutio says, "A plague o' both your houses" because the feud between the Capulet and Montague families has led to the events that resulted in his death. He speaks these words in Act 3, Scene 1, and his words turn out to be very prophetic as the play unfolds.

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  • Q:

    How does Mercutio feel about Tybalt?

    A:

    Mercutio feels anger and dislike for Tybalt. Tybalt often displays vengeful conduct by calling out his fury and disgust. He even challenges Romeo Montague to a duel. Mercutio and Romeo are best friends. When Romeo refuses to fight Tybalt, Mercutio takes his place.

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  • Q:

    How did the Montagues and the Capulets become enemies?

    A:

    It is never revealed why the Montagues and Capulets, the two feuding families in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," become enemies. In the first four lines of the prologue, it is explained that "Two households, both alike in dignity,/ In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,/ From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,/ Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean."

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  • Q:

    According to Mercutio in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," what kind of man is Tybalt?

    A:

    Mercutio uses Tybalt's sword-fighting skills as a metaphor for his character, dismissing his fashionable and precise style because he lacks spontaneity and creativity when he fights. Mercutio also states that Tybalt's precision stems from the desire to claim insult and demand a fight so that he can show off, then turns a phrase about Tybalt's use of French to imply that he has a French venereal disease instead.

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