Q:

What warning does the soothsayer give Caesar?

A:

Quick Answer

"Beware the Ides of March," warned the soothsayer to Julius Caesar in the tragic play by William Shakespeare. The Ides of March refers to the middle of the Roman month of Martius, or the 15th day of March.

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What warning does the soothsayer give Caesar?
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Full Answer

In the play "Julius Caesar," Caesar ignored the soothsayer's warning, as well as a similar premonition by his wife. The Ides of March was ultimately the day that Julius Caesar was assassinated by a band of senatorial conspirators.

Julius Caesar had been an important military and political leader in Rome. He is credited with playing a critical role in transforming the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.

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