Q:

What is the way to write a lyric poem?

A:

Quick Answer

To write a lyric poem, it is necessary to choose a topic, become inspired and write without rushing through the process. A lyric poem expresses the writer's personal feeling and emotions and is normally written in the first person.

Know More

Full Answer

A lyric poem doesn't tell a story that portrays certain actions and characters. Instead, it is addressed directly to the reader, where the poet uses effective imagery, emotional evocativeness, uniqueness and effective themes. A lyric poem should communicate with clarity, contiguity and focused impact. It is shorter and less complex than any other form of poems. Love, companionship and friendship are three of the most common topics people choose for lyric poetry.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the "if you sprinkle when you tinkle" poem?

    A:

    The “if you sprinkle when you tinkle” poem is designed to remind people to wipe the seat clean of urine that splashes about when using the toilet. The poem has different variations that end with “… be a sweetie and wipe the seat(ie)” or “… please be neat and wipe the seat.” Although the poem is well-known, according to Giggle Poetry, the origin of the poem is not known.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a bio poem?

    A:

    A bio poem is a biography in the form of a poem that follows a strict form with 11 lines, each listing specific characteristics about a person. Bio poems are used frequently in introductory lessons about poetry writing.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is an idiom poem?

    A:

    "Idiom poem" is not a formal literary term or category. It is thus up to personal interpretation, but it could either be any poem that makes use of idioms as its central focus or any poem written in a non-standard dialect of a language.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the words to the poem "Hiawatha"?

    A:

    The complete text of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "The Song of Hiawatha" runs over one hundred pages and is too long to be reprinted here. A much-anthologized excerpt begins: "On the shores of Gitche Gumee, / Of the shining Big Sea Water, / Stood Nokomis, the old woman, / Pointing with her finger westward, / O'er the water pointing westward, / To the purple clouds of sunset."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore