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Who wrote "The Minister's Black Veil"?

A:

Quick Answer

Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote "The Minister's Black Veil." First published in the anthology, "The Token and Atlantic Souvenir," in 1836, the story appeared the next year in a collection of Hawthorne's stories titled, "Twice-Told Tales."

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Full Answer

"The Minister's Black Veil" tells the story of Reverend Mr. Hooper, a clergyman in a small town. One day, he comes to the church wearing a black veil on his face. He preaches his regular sermon with the veil and continues to wear it both in public and in private for the rest of his life. The veil comes between him and his fiancée, who leaves him, and the villagers whisper about it behind his back. However, he continues to wear the veil, a symbol of some unknown sin in his life, until his death, and becomes a beloved figure among his parishioners.

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