Q:

What Is 1/20 14k as it pertains to jewelry?

A:

Quick Answer

A stamp of 1/20 14K on jewelry indicates that the piece is gold-filled. The 1/20 means that there is one part gold to every 20 parts of other materials. The 14K on the stamp notes that the gold used is 14-carat gold.

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Full Answer

Gold-filled jewelry is commonly known as costume jewelry. It typically is of little financial value, unlike items made of solid gold. Jewelry that is marked above 1/20 is considered gold-plated rather than gold-filled because the gold content is higher in the piece. Typically there are 5 grams of gold in a 1/20 gold-filled piece, or 5 percent real gold content.

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    What does the number 925 on jewelry mean?

    A:

    The number 925 on jewelry shows how much sterling silver is present in the piece. The number describes the parts per thousand. This specific number is most often present on silver flatware, jewelry and tea sets.

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  • Q:

    What does "585" mean on jewelry?

    A:

    On jewelry, "585" is a measure of gold's purity and indicates that the piece is made from 14-karat gold. This number is derived from the percentage of pure gold expressed as parts per 1,000. This system of certification is widely used in Europe.

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    How do you organize jewelry?

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    To organize your jewelry, separate out your fine jewelry, and secure the pieces in a locking jewelry box. Select several pretty pieces of costume jewelry for a wall display, and organize the rest in a large jewelry box.

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    What does 750 on jewelry mean?

    A:

    A 750 mark on jewelry means that the metal alloy used to make the jewellery contains 75 percent gold or another precious metal. Most precious metals used in jewelry are alloys because the addition of other metals improves hardness and durability. It also changes the color of the metal.

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