Q:

Where are Bass shoes made?

A:

As of 2014, the high-end Bass Weejuns penny loafer, retailing for $295, is handcrafted and handsewn in Maine, after the original Maine factory was closed in 1998. Bass makes budget-priced Weejuns in Central American factories, but it was considering a move to Brazil as of 2013.

Launching in 1876, G.H. Bass & Co. made shoes in Maine. G.H. Bass & Co. introduced Bass Weejuns, the world's first penny loafer, in 1936. In 1998, Phillips-Van Heusen Corp., the parent company of G.H. Bass & Co., closed the Maine plant and moved the manufacturing operations to other factories in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.


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