Q:

What do happy sad face tattoos represent?

A:

Quick Answer

The happy-face sad-face tattoo represents the principle of laughing now and crying later. A person who gets this tattoo can believe that it's best to live life to the fullest now and deal with the consequences later, according to Bullseye Tattoos.

 Know More

Full Answer

The happy and sad faces of the tattoo can also represent comedy and tragedy. The faces are ancient Greek theater masks; they are said to be the faces of Melpomene and Thalia, who are the muses of comedy and tragedy. The masks were used to convey the feelings the actors on stage were trying to portray. They can also indicate that the wearer of the tattoo is very passionate.

Learn more about Tattoos

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How can you get black and gray tattoos?

    A:

    The best way to get a great black and gray tattoo design is to find a talented professional tattoo artist who specializes in doing black and gray work. Black and gray tattoos are admired for their intricate photorealism.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How are henna tattoos made to last longer?

    A:

    The most effective tip in preserving a henna tattoo is to avoid frequent washing of the hennaed area with soap. Other people suggest the application of Vaseline or baby oil on the henna tattoo before taking a shower or bath.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you design half-sleeve tattoos?

    A:

    To design a half-sleeve tattoo, it is most important to have detailed reference information. There is limited space in a half-sleeve tattoo, so it is important that the artist knows why the desired imagery is significant. This allows them to tailor the finished design to the wants and needs of the client.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    When did tattoos begin?

    A:

    The first known cosmetic tattoo was discovered on a mummy dating back to 6,000 B.C. in South America. The tattoo was of a mustache on a woman.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore