Q:

Where does it hurt the most to get a tattoo?

A:

The most painful places on the body to get a tattoo are the eyeball, the pubic mound (mons pubis), the top of the foot, the ankle, behind the ear and the place above the rib cage on the chest.

Factors that influence the pain level of a tattoo are the number of nerve endings in the tissue and the amount of fat in the specific area. The eyeball, mons pubis and behind the ear all have a large number of nerves (along with a lack of fatty tissue), while the foot, ankle and the chest all have minimal fat. In addition, the amount a pain someone experiences will depend on an individuals threshold for pain.

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