Q:

What is a 6(d) certificate in Massachusetts?

A:

Quick Answer

A 6(d) certificate is a document that an owner must obtain when selling a condo in Massachusetts; it ensures that all fees pertaining to the unit being sold have been paid. The associated property management company or condo association can provide the owner with this document, and there may be a fee involved. The lender is the entity requiring this certificate.

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Full Answer

This certificate not only protects buyers from facing unpaid condo fees or assessment fees, but it also protects the seller, lender and the condo association. The 6(d) certificate has to be notarized to be valid, and multiple signatures are required. The process can take some time, so it is important to request the document as soon as there is a confirmed buyer.

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