Q:

What was the average wheat yield per acre in the 1800s?

A:

The average yield per acre of wheat during the 1800s was 13.3 bushels per acre, according to the USDA. By contrast, the average U.S. wheat yield per acre in 2013 was 47.2 bushels per acre.

The significant increase in wheat and other crop yields per acre in the United States and other countries can be attributed to the agricultural revolution. The agricultural revolution introduced machines to farming, allowing for more production each day over previous hand methods. With improvements in pesticides, irrigation, crop rotation methods and genetic breeding, output has continued to increase per acre although it is leveling off overall.


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